What are we reading? | VailDaily.com

What are we reading?

Wren Wertin

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “Bel Canto,” by Ann Patchett: When terrorists seize hostages at an embassy party, an unlikely assortment of people is thrown together, including American opera star Roxanne Coss and Mr. Hosokawa, a Japanese CEO and her biggest fan.

2. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

3. “Ida: Her Labor of Love,” by Carol McManus: Men rushed to Colorado in the late 1800s looking for gold and riches. However, we seldom read about the families they brought with them. Here is the compelling story of one pioneer woman’s tribulations and joys as she struggled to keep her family alive and healthy.

4. “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress,” by Sijie Dai: Set during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of two hapless city boys sent to a remote mountain village for reeducation. Struggling to stave off despair, the boys find salvation in two discoveries: the charming daughter of the local tailor and a trove of forbidden Western classics in Chinese translation.

5. “Downhill Slide,” by Hal Clifford: A former Skiing Magazine editor takes on three publicly owned ski companies and explains why they’re bad for skiing and the environment.

6. “Powder Burn,” by Daniel Glick: This suspenseful whodunnit exposes the fascinating underside of Vail’s ski-town culture when arson massively damaged the resort in 1998. The investigation in the ultra-rich town reveals a strange, complicated community where everyone is a logical suspect.

7. “Lovely Bones,” by Alice Sebold: The spirit of 14-year-old Susie Salmon describes her murder, her surprise at her new home in heaven, and her witness to her family’s grief in their efforts to find the killer.

8. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

9. “Passion of Artemisia,” by Susan Vreeland: Presenting a fictionalized version of the life of Artemisia Gentileschi, known for her contributions to Renaissance art and for the rape she suffered at the hands of her father’s painting partner, the author celebrates of the power of art.

10. “Atkins For Life: The Complete Controlled Carb Program for Permanent Weight Loss,” by Robert Atkins With millions following Atkins diet plans, Atkins now compiles a complete controlled carb program for permanent weight loss and good health, with 200 menu plans and 125 recipes.

Verbatim Booksellers in Lionshead

1. “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress,” by Sijie Dai: Set during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of two hapless city boys sent to a remote mountain village for reeducation. Struggling to stave off despair, the boys find salvation in two discoveries: the charming daughter of the local tailor and a trove of forbidden Western classics in Chinese translation.

2. “Peace Like a River,” by Leif Enger: Eleven-year-old asthmatic Reuben Land chronicles the Land family’s odyssey in search of Reuben’s older brother, Davy, who has escaped from jail before he can stand trial for the killing of two marauders who came to their Minnesota farm to harm the family.

3. “Vail: Triumph of a Dream” by Pete Seibert: A colorful chronicle of Vail’s colorful history.

4. “Hours,” by Michael Cunningham: This book draws on the life and work of Virginia Woolf to tell the story of a group of contemporary characters struggling with the conflicting claims of love and inheritance, hope and despair.

5. “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress,” by Dai Sieji: At the height of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, two young boys are sent to the country for “reeducation” at a remote mountain village, where their lives take an unexpected turn when they meet the beautiful daughter of a local tailor and stumble upon a forbidden stash of Western classics in Chinese translations.

6. “Girl in Hyacinth Blue,” by Susan Vreeland: Chronicles the history of a Vermeer painting and the lives with which it intersects, from the artist’s inspiration to its admiration by two art scholars 300 years later, demonstrating the enduring power of art in the face of natural disaster, political upheaval and personal turmoil.

7. “Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius,” by Dave Eggers: A memoir of a college senior who, in the space of five weeks, loses both of his parents to cancer and inherits his 8-year-old brother. The book manages to be simultaneously hilarious and inventive as well as a heartfelt story of the love that holds a family together.

8. “Miracle Life of Edgar Mint,” by Brady Udall: At the beginning of this high-spirited novel of the American West, a boy on an Apache Indian reservation in Arizona has his head run over by a mail truck. Nevertheless, the book is anything but tragic – or, at least, not purely tragic.

9. “Crow Lake,” by Mary Lawson: In the rural farm country of northern Ontario, the lives of two families – the farming Pye family, and zoologist Kate Morrison and her three brothers – are brought together and torn apart by misunderstanding, resentment, family love and tragedy.

10. “Passion of Artemisia,” by Susan Vreeland: Presenting a fictionalized version of the life of Artemisia Gentileschi, known for her contributions to Renaissance art and for the rape she suffered at the hands of her father’s painting partner, the author celebrates of the power of art.




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