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What are we reading?

Wren Wertin

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

2. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free. She and Rosaleen take off for a town called Tiburon, South Carolina, a name she found on the back of a picture amid the few possessions left by her mother.



3. “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress,” by Sijie Dai: Set during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of two hapless city boys sent to a remote mountain village for reeducation. Struggling to stave off despair, the boys find salvation in two discoveries: the charming daughter of the local tailor and a trove of forbidden Western classics in Chinese translation.

4. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.



5. “King of Torts,” by John Grisham: A tale of a young public defender who finds himself in the middle of a complex case against one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies. The case could result in an enormous settlement – and make him the legal profession’s newest king of torts.

6. “Lovely Bones,” by Alice Sebold: The spirit of 14-year-old Susie Salmon describes her murder, her surprise at her new home in heaven, and her witness to her family’s grief in their efforts to find the killer.

7. “Endurance,” by Alfred Lansing: Shipwrecked and marooned for months, an ill-fated voyage becomes a triumphant story of indomitable courage and faith in the face of astounding obstacles.



8. “Passion of Artemisia,” by Susan Vreeland: Presenting a fictionalized version of the life of Artemisia Gentileschi, known for her contributions to Renaissance art and for the rape she suffered at the hands of her father’s painting partner, the author celebrates of the power of art.9. “Dr Atkins’ New Diet Revolution,” by Robert Atkins: The diet and complementary medicine guru has updated his proven program for a new century, offering new information based on scientifically supported controlled carbohydrate principles.

10. “Atkins For Life: The Complete Controlled Carb Program for Permanent Weight Loss,” by Robert Atkins With millions following Atkins diet plans, Atkins now compiles a complete controlled carb program for permanent weight loss and good health, with 200 menu plans and 125 recipes.

Verbatim Booksellers in Lionshead

1.”Vail: Triumph of a Dream” by Pete Seibert: A colorful chronicle of Vail’s colorful history.

2.”Passion of Artemisia,” by Susan Vreeland: Presenting a fictionalized version of the life of Artemisia Gentileschi, known for her contributions to Renaissance art and for the rape she suffered at the hands of her father’s painting partner, the author celebrates of the power of art.

3. “Miracle Life of Edgar Mint,” by Brady Udall: At the beginning of this high-spirited novel of the American West, a boy on an Apache Indian reservation in Arizona has his head run over by a mail truck. Nevertheless, the book is anything but tragic – or, at least, not purely tragic.

4.-“Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free. She and Rosaleen take off for a town called Tiburon, South Carolina, a name she found on the back of a picture amid the few possessions left by her mother.

5. “If You Can’t Live Without Me, Why Aren’t You Dead Yet?,” by Cynthia Heimel: A humorous look at women’s lives in contemporary society presents commentary on PMS and outfits, yuppies eating in fancy restaurants while homeless people stare in the window, and more.

6.-“Inventors of Vail,” by Dick Hauserman: Chronicles the first decade of Vail’s history as a ski resort.

7.-“Downhill Slide,” by Hal Clifford: A former Skiing Magazine editor takes on three publicly owned ski companies and explains why they’re bad for skiing and the environment.

8.-“Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress,” by Sijie Dai: Set during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of two hapless city boys sent to a remote mountain village for reeducation. Struggling to stave off despair, the boys find salvation in two discoveries: the charming daughter of the local tailor and a trove of forbidden Western classics in Chinese translation.

9.”Bringing Down the House,” by Ben Mezrich: The story of 6 MIT students who took Vegas for millions.

10. “Empire Falls,” by Richard Russo: Miles Roby tries to hold his family together while working at the Empire Grill in the once-successful logging town of Empire Falls, while dealing with the imperious Mrs. Whiting, the heir to a faded logging and textile legacy.


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