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What are we reading?

Wren Wertin

Verbatim Booksellers

1. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

2.-“Letters from Yellowstone,” by Diane Smith: In the spring of 1898, A. E. (Alexandria) Bartram – a spirited young woman with a love for botany – is invited to join a field study in Yellowstone National Park. The study’s leader assumes she is a man, and is less than pleased to discover the truth. Once overcoming the shock of having a woman on their team, the group forms an enlightening web of relationships as they move from Mammoth Hot Springs to a camp high in the backcountry. But as they make their way collecting amid Yellowstone’s beauty the group is splintered by differing views on science, nature and economics.

3. “If you listen: Poems and Photographs of the San Juan Mountains,” by Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer: This book of poetry and black and white photography brings the awe-inspiring San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado into the reader’s own home.

4. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

5.-“Girl with a Pearl Earring,” by Tracy Chevalier: A fictional story of the Dutch painter Vermeer, and the young serving girl who became the subject of one of his paintings.

6.-“Miracle Life of Edgar Mint,” by Brady Udall: At the beginning of this high-spirited novel of the American West, a boy on an Apache Indian reservation in Arizona has his head run over by a mail truck. Nevertheless, the book is anything but tragic – or, at least, not purely tragic.

7. “Laughter in the Valley of Madness,” by Eric Herm: In pursuit of the quintessence of youth, Garrett Meek has found a festive home and decadent lifestyle in the world famous ski resort of Vail, Colo.

8.-“Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living,” by Joseph Marshall: A descendant of Crazy Horse adapts Lakota spiritual wisdom and traditions to modern life – using poetry, songs and folklore – to fundamental ideas about the essential 12 qualities of human character.

9. “Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: An in depth guide to the trails of Eagle County, from easy to difficult.

10. “Fast Food Nation,” by Eric Schlosser: Fast food has hastened the mauling of our landscape, widened the chasm between rich and poor, fueled an epidemic of obesity and propelled American cultural imperialism abroad. That’s a lengthy list of charges, but the author makes them stick with an artful mix of first-rate reportage, wry wit and reasoning.

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “Brownsville,” by Oscar Casares: At the country’s edge, on the Mexican border, Brownsville, Texas, is a town like many others. It is a place where people work hard to create better lives for their children, where people bear grudges against their neighbors, where love blossoms only to fade, and where the only real certainty is that life holds surprises.

2. “Miracle Life of Edgar Mint,” by Brady Udall: At the beginning of this high-spirited novel of the American West, a boy on an Apache Indian reservation in Arizona has his head run over by a mail truck. Nevertheless, the book is anything but tragic – or, at least, not purely tragic.

3. “If you listen: Poems and Photographs of the San Juan Mountains,” by Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer: This book of poetry and black and white photography brings the awe-inspiring San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado into the reader’s own home.

4. “Letters from Yellowstone,” by Diane Smith: In the spring of 1898, A. E. (Alexandria) Bartram – a spirited young woman with a love for botany – is invited to join a field study in Yellowstone National Park. The study’s leader assumes she is a man, and is less than pleased to discover the truth. Once overcoming the shock of having a woman on their team, the group forms an enlightening web of relationships as they move from Mammoth Hot Springs to a camp high in the backcountry. But as they make their way collecting amid Yellowstone’s beauty the group is splintered by differing views on science, nature and economics.

5. “Persian Pickle Club,” by Sandra Dallas: Before The Ya Ya Sisterhood there was The Persian Pickle Club, a group of Depression-era women who gather in Harleyville, Kansas to improve their minds, share secrets and put their quilting skills to good use.

6. “Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living,” by Joseph Marhall: A descendant of Crazy Horse adapts Lakota spiritual wisdom and traditions to modern life – using poetry, songs and folklore – to fundamental ideas about the essential 12 qualities of human character.

7. “Diary of Mattie Spencer,” by Sandra Dallas: After a whirlwind marriage, Mattie Spenser and her mysterious husband move to the harsh but beautiful Colorado plains. As they struggle to make a life together, Mattie learns some bitter truths about her new husband, and finds love where she least expects it.

8. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

9. “Ultimate Gift,” by Jim Stovall: Red Stevens owned everything a man could ask for, and he generously supported his entire extended family, asking nothing in return. Near the end of his life, however, Red realized one thing: in giving his family everything, he had given them nothing.

10. “Writing to Heal the Soul: Transforming Grief and Loss Through Writing,” by Susan Zimmermann: This book is Susan Zimmermann’s gift to others who find themselves facing grief or loss, whether through death, disability, illness, divorce or other difficulties. It offers clear, simple exercises to focus the writing process, vivid examples from men and women on the same path, and an exploration of the stratagems of journaling, grief work, and creative writing.


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