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What are we reading?

Daily Staff Report

These lists reflect the top 10 bestsellers at local independent bookstores, Verbatim Booksellers in Lionshead and The Bookworm of Edwards.

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: As Harry enters his fifth year at wizard school, it seems the bonds of friendship and trust have never been more sorely tested. Lord Voldemort’s rise has opened a rift in the wizarding world between those who believe the truth about his return, and those who prefer to believe it’s all madness and lies and just more trouble for Harry Potter.



2. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

3. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cryptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.



4. “East of Eden,” by John Steinbeck: Oprah brings her book club back with this sprawling and often brutal novel. Set in the rich farmlands of California’s Salinas Valley, it follows the intertwined destinies of two families, the Trasks and the Hamiltons, whose generations helplessly re-enact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel.

5. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

6. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.



7. “Atonement,” by Ian McEwan: On a hot summer day in 1935, 13-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives – together with her precocious literary gifts – forces a situation that will change the course of their lives.

8. “Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: A compilation of easy, moderate and difficult hikes in the Eagle County area. Extensive maps and directions.

9. “Wideacre,” by Phillippa Gregory: Set in 18th century England, Beatrice Lacey is a heroine who makes Scarlett O’Hara look like a simpering weakling. Part of a trilogy.

10. “Virgin Blue,” by Tracy Chevalier: Never before published in the United States, this is the first novel by the critically acclaimed author of “Girl with a Pearl Earring.” In it, readers meet Ella Turner and Isabelle du Moulin – two women born centuries apart, yet bound by a fateful family legacy.

Verbatim Booksellers

1. “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: As Harry enters his fifth year at wizard school, it seems the bonds of friendship and trust have never been more sorely tested. Lord Voldemort’s rise has opened a rift in the wizarding world between those who believe the truth about his return, and those who prefer to believe it’s all madness and lies and just more trouble for Harry Potter.

2. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

3.-“Book on tape: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: The author reads the book about Harry in his fifth year at wizard school.

4.-“Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

5. “No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency,” by Alexander McCall Smith:

This first novel in Alexander McCall Smith’s series tells the story of the cunning and engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to “help people with problems in their lives,” such as track down missing husbands, uncover a con man and follow a wayward daughter.

6. “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” by J.K. Rowling: The debut novel of the Harry Potter series tells the story of Harry, who, having endured 10 miserable years with his hideous aunt and uncle, is invited soon after his 11th birthday to attend the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. There he learns of his distinguished wizardly pedigree – and his frightening destiny.

7.-“Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

8. “Three Junes,” by Julia Glass: Glass’s first novel traces the lives of a Scottish family across three summers, as they experience the joys and frustrations, sadness and possibilities offered by romantic and familial love.

9. “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” by Azar Nafisi: The true story of a group of young women who came together in secret every Thursday to read and talk about forbidden Western classics – and their lives and loves – in the Islamic Republic of Iran.- A portrait of the Iran-Iraq war viewed from Tehran that gives a rare glimpse, from the inside, of women’s lives in revolutionary Iran.

10. “Fire and Ashes: On the Frontlines of American Wildfire,” by John Maclean: An expert’s report from the front lines where wildland fires keep getting hotter, bigger and more dangerous to the men and women who fight them. In 2002, more than 7 million acres were burned at a fire-fighting cost of over a billion dollars. Are wilderness fires now a tragic and enduring feature of the American landscape? Maclean, author of “Fire on the Mountain,” offers a view from the front lines, combining action-packed storytelling with moving insights about firefighters and informed analysis of firefighting strategy past and present. The author will be at Verbatim for a booksigning Tuesday.


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