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What are we Reading?

This list reflects the top 10 bestsellers at local bookstores The Bookworm of Edwards and Verbatim Booksellers in Lionshead.

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: As Harry enters his fifth year at wizard school, it seems the bonds of friendship and trust have never been more sorely tested. Lord Voldemort’s rise has opened a rift in the wizarding world between those who believe the truth about his return, and those who prefer to believe it’s all madness and lies and just more trouble for Harry Potter.



2. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cyptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

3. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.



4. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

5. “Virgin Blue,” by Tracy Chevalier: Never before published in the United States, this first novel is released by the critically acclaimed author of “Girl with a Pearl Earring” and “Falling Angels.” Readers meet Ella Turner and Isabelle du Moulin-two women born centuries apart, yet bound by a fateful family legacy.

6. “Atonement,” by Ian McEwan: On a hot summer day in 1935, 13-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives – together with her precocious literary gifts – forces a situation that will change the course of their lives.



7. “Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

8. “Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland A compilation of hikes in Eagle County, from easy to difficult. Also includes maps, photos and a bit of local history.

9. “Wideacre,” by Phillippa Gregory: Set in 18th century England, “Wideacre” introduces Beatrice Lacey, a heroine who makes Scarlett O’Hara look like a simpering weakling. Readers will fall in love with Philippa Gregory’s mesmerizing trilogy.

10. “Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood,” by Alexandra Fuller: Bobo (Fuller’s childhood nickname) grew up on a farm in Africa. Her father was always away fighting for the whites in the Rhodesian civil war. Her mother, in turn was forced to take care of the farm in her husband’s absense. She taught her daughters, by example, to be resilient and self-sufficient, and she instilled in Bobo a love of reading and of storytelling that proved to be her salvation. It is the story of one woman’s unbreakable bond with a continent and the people who inhabit it, a portrait lovingly realized and deeply felt.

Verbatim Booksellers

1. “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: As Harry enters his fifth year at wizard school, it seems the bonds of friendship and trust have never been more sorely tested. Lord Voldemort’s rise has opened a rift in the wizarding world between those who believe the truth about his return, and those who prefer to believe it’s all madness and lies and just more trouble for Harry Potter.

2. “Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: A compilation of hikes in Eagle County, from easy to difficult. Also includes maps, photos and a bit of local history.

3. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cyptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

4. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

5. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

6. “Virgin Blue,” by Tracy Chevalier: Never before published in the United States, this first novel is released by the critically acclaimed author of “Girl with a Pearl Earring” and “Falling Angels.” Readers meet Ella Turner and Isabelle du Moulin-two women born centuries apart, yet bound by a fateful family legacy.

7.”Bel Canto,” by Ann Patchett: When terrorists seize hostages at an embassy party, an unlikely assortment of people is thrown together, including American opera star Roxanne Coss and Mr. Hosokawa, a Japanese CEO and her biggest fan.

8. “Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

9.”Letters from Yellowstone,” by Diane Smith: In the spring of 1898, A. E. (Alexandria) Bartram – a spirited young woman with a love for botany – is invited to join a field study in Yellowstone National Park. The study’s leader assumes she is a man, and is less than pleased to discover the truth. Once overcoming the shock of having a woman on their team, the group forms an enlightening web of relationships as they move from Mammoth Hot Springs to a camp high in the backcountry. But as they make their way collecting amid Yellowstone’s beauty the group is splintered by differing views on science, nature and economics.

10.-“No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency,” by Alexander McCall Smith:

This first novel in Alexander McCall Smith’s series tells the story of the cunning and engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to “help people with problems in their lives,” such as track down missing husbands, uncover a con man and follow a wayward daughter.


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