What are we reading? | VailDaily.com

What are we reading?

Daily Staff Report

These lists represent the top 10 bestsellers at local independent bookstores Verbatim Booksellers in Vail Village and The Bookworm of Edwards.

Verbatim Booksellers in Vail

1.”Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cryptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

2. “The Five People You Meet in Heaven,” by Mitch Albom: From the author of “Tuesdays with Morrie” comes a novel that explores the unexpected connections of readers’ lives and the idea that heaven is more than a place – it’s an answer.

3. “Middlesex,” by Jeffrey Eugenides: Spanning eight decades, Eugenides’ long-awaited second novel is a grand, utterly original fable of crossed bloodlines, the intricacies of gender, and the deep, untidy promptings of desire.

4. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

Recommended Stories For You

5. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

6. “Blessing of a Skinned Knee: Using Jewish Teachings to Raise Self-Reliant Children,” by Wendy Mogel: Clinical psychologist Mogel looked to her religious heritage for methods to help clients and family members to “find grace and security.” “In the time-tested lessons of Judaism, I discovered insights and practical tools that spoke directly to these issues,” writes Mogel.

7. “Every Second Counts,” by Lance Armstrong. Every Second Counts confronts the challenge of moving beyond his cancer experience, his first Tour victory, and his celebrity status. Few of his readers will ever compete in the Tour de France (though cyclists will relish Armstrong’s detailed recounting of his 2000-2003 tour victories), but all will relate to his discussions of loss and disappointment in his personal and professional life since 1999.

8. “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” Author: Lewis Carroll, Illustrator: Robert Sabuda: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is Robert Sabuda’s most amazing creation ever, featuring stunning pop-ups illustrated in John Tenniel’s classic style. The text is faithful to Lewis Carroll’s original story, and special effects like a Victorian peep show, multifaceted foil, and tactile elements make this a pop-up to read and admire again and again.

9. “Golden Buddha,” by Clive Cussler: Clive Cussler introduces his latest and most intriguing high seas action hero: the enigmatic captain of the Oregon, Juan Cabrillo. It’s up to Cabrillo and his crew of expert intelligence and Naval men to put Tibet back in the hands of the Dalai Lama by striking a deal with the Russians and the Chinese. His gambling chip is a golden Buddha containing records of vast oil reserves in the disputed land. But first, he’ll have to locate–and steal–the all-important artifact. And there are certain people who would do anything in their power to see him fail.

10. “Wicked,” by Gregory Maguire: Now featured as a Broadway musical, Wicked is about a land where animals talk and strive to be treated like first-class citizens, Munchkinlanders seek the comfort of middle-class stability and the Tin Man becomes a victim of domestic violence. And then there is the little green-skinned girl named Elphaba, who will grow up to be the infamous Wicked Witch of the West, a smart, prickly and misunderstood creature who challenges all our preconceived notions about the nature of good and evil. (Maguire will be in Vail in April as one of the featured authors for the Festival of Words).

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “The Five People You Meet in Heaven,” by Mitch Albom: From the author of “Tuesdays with Morrie” comes a novel that explores the unexpected connections of readers’ lives and the idea that heaven is more than a place – it’s an answer.

2. “The Solace of Leaving Early,” by Haven Kimmel: In her rich and nuanced debut novel, Haven Kimmel brings to life two irresistible people at odds with their small-town lives and with each other. Told with remarkable wit and sweeping empathy, The Solace of Leaving Early is the story of finding our better selves through accepting the shortcomings of others. With gentle humor, beautiful prose, and a warm empathy for the buried wounds of the human heart, Haven Kimmel has created an unforgettable and wise debut. (Featured as this month’s Valley Read and offered at 15% discount at both bookstores)

3. “Vail, Triumph of a Dream,” by Pete Seibert:

4. “Eragon,” by Christopher Paolini: One boyŠOne dragonŠA world of adventure Š When Eragon finds a polished blue stone in the forest, he thinks it is the lucky discovery of a poor farm boy; perhaps it will buy his family meat for the winter. But when the stone brings a dragon hatchling, Eragon realizes he has stumbled upon a legacy nearly as old as the Empire itself. Overnight his simple life is shattered, and he is thrust into a perilous new world of destiny, magic, and power.

5. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

6. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cryptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

7. “Every Second Counts,” by Lance Armstrong. Every Second Counts confronts the challenge of moving beyond his cancer experience, his first Tour victory, and his celebrity status. Few of his readers will ever compete in the Tour de France (though cyclists will relish Armstrong’s detailed recounting of his 2000-2003 tour victories), but all will relate to his discussions of loss and disappointment in his personal and professional life since 1999.

8. “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” Author: Lewis Carroll, Illustrator: Robert Sabuda: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is Robert Sabuda’s most amazing creation ever, featuring stunning pop-ups illustrated in John Tenniel’s classic style. The text is faithful to Lewis Carroll’s original story, and special effects like a Victorian peep show, multifaceted foil, and tactile elements make this a pop-up to read and admire again and again.

9. “Golden Buddha,” by Clive Cussler: Clive Cussler introduces his latest and most intriguing high seas action hero: the enigmatic captain of the Oregon, Juan Cabrillo. It’s up to Cabrillo and his crew of expert intelligence and Naval men to put Tibet back in the hands of the Dalai Lama by striking a deal with the Russians and the Chinese. His gambling chip is a golden Buddha containing records of vast oil reserves in the disputed land. But first, he’ll have to locate–and steal–the all-important artifact. And there are certain people who would do anything in their power to see him fail.

10. “Wicked,” by Gregory Maguire: Now featured as a Broadway musical, Wicked is about a land where animals talk and strive to be treated like first-class citizens, Munchkinlanders seek the comfort of middle-class stability and the Tin Man becomes a victim of domestic violence. And then there is the little green-skinned girl named Elphaba, who will grow up to be the infamous Wicked Witch of the West, a smart, prickly and misunderstood creature who challenges all our preconceived notions about the nature of good and evil. (Maguire will be in Vail in April as one of the featured authors for the Festival of Words).