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What are we reading?

Wren Wertin

Verbatim Booksellers in Lionshead

1. Downhill Slide by Hal Clifford: A former Skiing Magazine editor takes on three publicly owned ski companies and explains why they’re bad for skiing and the environment.

2. Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold: The spirit of 14-year-old Susie Salmon describes her murder, her surprise at her new home in heaven, and her witness to her family’s grief in their efforts to find the killer.

3. Colorado Colore by Junior League of Denver: A compilation of recipes by the Junior League of Denver.

4. Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Sijie Dai: Set during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of two hapless city boys sent to a remote mountain village for reeducation. Struggling to stave off despair, the boys find salvation in two discoveries: the charming daughter of the local tailor and a trove of forbidden Western classics in Chinese translation.

5. It’s Not about the Bike by Lance Armstrong: The story of one man’s journey through triumph, tragedy, transformation and transcendence, it details the story of Lance Armstrong, the world-famous two-time winner of the Tour de France, and his fight against cancer.

6. Empire Falls by Richard Russo: In this droll, unsentimental novel, Richard Russo tells the story of a big-hearted man who becomes the unlikely hero of a small town with a glorious past but a dubious future.

7. Inventors of Vail by Dick Hauserman: Chronicles the first decade of Vail’s history as a ski resort

8. Powder Burn by Daniel Glick: With a new epilogue by the author, this “alpine “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil'” explores an unsolved mystery and uncovers the dark underside of the new West.

9. Athlete by Howard Schatz: The photographs in “Athlete” embody the astonishing range of the physical perfection required to be a champion. In all, more than 120 athletes at the top of their game are featured in this collection of 210 photographs that make a celebration of the body as a divine machine, while presenting a collective view of the human spirit at its most intense.

10. Tao of Abundance by Laurence Boldt: Through his integration of Eastern philosophy and practical advice, the author has helped readers find personal satisfaction in their work and personal lives. Now he applies these principles to the subject of abundance: How do we achieve material wealth without sacrificing our souls?

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. Colorado Colore by Junior League of Denver: A compilation of recipes by the Junior League of Denver.

2. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

3. Downhill Slide by Hal Clifford: A former Skiing Magazine editor takes on three publicly owned ski companies and explains why they’re bad for skiing and the environment.

4. Night Before Christmas by Robert Sabuda: Clement Clarke Moore’s classic tale of “The Night Before Christmas” is brought to pop-up life in this edition.

5. Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold: The spirit of 14-year-old Susie Salmon describes her murder, her surprise at her new home in heaven, and her witness to her family’s grief in their efforts to find the killer.

6. Vail: Triumph of a Dream by Pete Seibert: Vail Triumph of a Dream by Pete Seibert: A colorful chronicle of Vail’s colorful history.

7. Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle: Shows how a combination of Buddhist principles, meditation theory and relaxation techniques can connect a person to the eternal, ever-present One Life beyond the many forms of life that are subject to birth and death.

8. To America by Stephen Ambrose: Looks back upon what has made our nation great but also the underbelly of the American myth. Taking swings at today’s political correctness, as well as his own early biases, Ambrose grapples with the country’s historic sins of racism, its neglect and ill treatment of Native Americans, and some of its tragic errors, such as the war in Vietnam. Ambrose ultimately explains his love affair with this great and strange country.

9. Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Sijie Dai: Set during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of two hapless city boys sent to a remote mountain village for reeducation. Struggling to stave off despair, the boys find salvation in two discoveries: the charming daughter of the local tailor and a trove of forbidden Western classics in Chinese translation.

10. Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily’s only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen, her “stand-in mother.” In 1964, Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town. Lily and Rosaleen take off for a town called Tiburon, South Carolina, a name she found on the back of a picture amid the few possessions left by her mother. They are taken in by three black, bee-keeping sisters. Lily enters their mesmerizing secret world of bees and honey, and of the Black Madonna who presides over this household of strong, wise women.


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