What’s in our CD player? | VailDaily.com
YOUR AD HERE »

What’s in our CD player?

Staff Reports

1. Elvis Costello & the Imposters, The Delivery Man: When you have this much talent and a name that’s a part of pop culture, you’re allowed to make an album that covers every genre from country to soul. Elvis does just that on his newest album and, as only a complete genius could do, he sings a duet with his second wife, Cait O’Riordan, while dedicating the album to his third wife, Diana Hall.2. Mark Knopfler, Shangri-La: This four-time Grammy winner who has sold some 110 million albums worldwide, both on his own and with the Dire Straits, has delivered a solo album that makes us all forget about his ’80s heyday. Named for the Malibu studio where the album was recorded, Shangri-La is as chill as a California breeze while still being poignant. Many describe the album as understated, kind of like L.A.3. Warren Haynes, Live at Bonnaroo: Although best known for his work with the Allman Brothers Band and Government Mule, this solo performance at the biggest music festival in the country shows that Warren’s style is solid, unique, and soulful and solidifies his place as one of the best musicians in the world. But, the acoustic music is unusual, as Warren is thought of as a master of the electric guitar.4. Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Funeral for a Friend: We first heard these guys when they were upstaging Widespread Panic in Colorado jam shows. But, their new album traces a New Orleans brass band tradition, which the Dozen have exemplified since their inception in 1977. The album is a poignant concept piece, reliving the funeral of the late “Tuba Fats” Lacen, one of the band’s founders. The music comes alive with both joy and sorrow.5. Otis Taylor, Double V: Otis’ daughter Cassie is a featured inspiration on this album, singing backup vocals on most songs and taking the lead on the song “Buy Myself Some Freedom.” The two work together to present a lighter side of Otis’s music, although the album still handles some tough issues, such as poverty on “Plastic Spoon” and the self-descriptive “Mama’s Selling Heroin.” This is blues music at its best, with inspiring vocals and a range of emotion. VT


Support Local Journalism


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User