Where does Colorado baker Jack Phillips’ religious freedom end and discrimination begin? | VailDaily.com

Where does Colorado baker Jack Phillips’ religious freedom end and discrimination begin?

baker Jack Phillips

Baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, manages his shop Monday, June 4, 2018, in Lakewood, Colo., after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that he could refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple because of his religious beliefs did not violate Colorado's anti-discrimination law.

WASHINGTON — Colorado baker Jack Phillips wants to start making wedding cakes again, but court experts are far from united on what kind of legal landscape he would face if he once more refused to do work for a same-sex couple — despite his victory this week in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Some lawyers argued that Phillips' actions remain discriminatory and that he needs to proceed carefully. Others saw the high-court ruling as leaving open a doorway for greater leverage of religion into corporate and civic life.

All agreed, however, that the question at the heart of the Phillips' case — where freedom of religion ends and discrimination begins — remains unanswered, and that both the marketplace and court system will continue to wrestle with that conflict for the immediate future.

For his part, Phillips said in two television appearances Tuesday that he hoped to return to the wedding industry after a six-year legal battle that started when he declined to make a cake in 2012 for fiancés Charlie Craig and David Mullins.

Read the full story at http://www.denverpost.com.