Vail Daily Hits and Misses | VailDaily.com

Vail Daily Hits and Misses

Got a quick Hit or Miss about issues, decisions or goings-on in the valley? Send yours to editor@vaildaily.com to be included.

MISS: From a reader who identified him or herself as “A non-white parent at (Eagle County Charter Academy)” to the school board for spending money on a lawyer “to go after the charter school” instead of on students and teachers while discussing the Charter Academy’s compliance with its contract to match the ethnic mix of students to the greater district and to the Vail Daily for covering the issue raised in the school board election this fall. The reader said the story was one-sided and a “smear campaign led by white parents that applied to the charter.”

MISS: To the Vail Daily from reader Kathy Heicher: “You missed on describing Minturn as the county’s ‘most historic and traditional town.’ That honor goes to Red Cliff, which was first settled in 1879, then became the county seat in 1883. Minturn didn’t really get on the maps until 1887, and incorporated in 1904.” (A small correction to the correction: We declared Minturn the valley’s most historic and traditional town.)

HIT: To the Vail Daily from Heicher: “I would have to give you a HIT on the fact that you didn’t suggest that Minturn was located in the mythical ‘Vail Valley.’”

MISS: From a reader “to the handful parents at Eagle Valley Middle School who refuse to allow their kids to participate in the shared responsibility of sweeping up the cafeteria after lunch. Apparently they feel it’s beneath them. Get our nose out of the air. You’re blocking the sun.”

HIT: To Crazy Mountain Brewery expanding into Breckenridge Brewery’s spacious facility in Denver. That’s a big, big move.

MISS: To I-70 delays to the east and the west, though in construction season this seems pretty much unavoidable. Mountain life.

HIT: To Battle Mountain High School retiring the number of 1985 quarterback Scott Ward, who led the Huskies to the state finals for the first time in the school’s history. He went on to become an elite Air Force pilot and recently died in a freak highway accident. The ceremony will take place at halftime of Battle Mountain’s home game Friday.

HIT: To the Man of the Cliff mountain man and lady competition flourishing at Avon’s Nottingham Park.

HIT: To new ski and snowboard movies in time to get everyone pumped up for the season to come.

MISS: To funding obstacles keeping the dream of a paved recreation path from East Vail to Dotsero from completion in the near future.

HIT: To candidate forums in election seasons.

MISS: To the Russian entry into Syria’s civil war with a decided Afghan-like approach. It will fail miserably as the Soviet incursion into Afghanistan failed, with apparently few lessons learned. Think we’ve made mistakes there? Russia is on its way to topping ours. We should let them and focus on Iraq and Turkey. Oh, Afghanistan, too.

HIT: To the Steadman Philippon Research Institute taking an interest in local school kids and encouraging their education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

MISS: To the accident long feared, in which a small child falls under the wheels of a vehicle in a parade.

HIT: To sidewalks and such at the north entrance to Minturn. The work will make a big difference.

HIT: If you happen to be well situated and for enough time, to again being able to sell your home for enough of a profit to move up locally to bigger and better.

HIT: To John Shipp earning the Eagle Community Impact Award. You could make that Eagle County easily for the restaurant company owner’s efforts with a variety of organizations and causes.

HIT: To the town of Vail when the big election issues are the usual ones: parking, housing and some kind of public center for gatherings of one kind or another. At root this means the town’s in pretty good shape, since somehow it has survived all this for more than half a century rather well.

HIT: To attendance at the two candidate forums this election season. The school board candidate forum filled the space at Colorado Mountain College, and the Vail Town Council forum continued a pattern of being the best attended of these things in the valley.