If information and enlightenment is what Epstein truly seeks, here’s some suggested reading (letter) | VailDaily.com

If information and enlightenment is what Epstein truly seeks, here’s some suggested reading (letter)

Letter to the Editor

I read Stewart Epstein's letter, "Thoughts on conservative thought," with a mixture of puzzlement and amusement (Tuesday, Sept. 25). Regarding his two cited sources, I read through them and found that "Dark Money" was nothing more than a 378-page diatribe against the Koch brothers. His second source, "Democracy in Chains," while not quite so full of dark references to the Kochs, was nothing more than a combination hit job on the Kochs and an apologia for every liberal/progressive program imaginable.

If Mr. Epstein is truly interested in understanding and becoming an expert on conservative thought, I wonder if in his 40-year project he has consulted the works of at least some of the leading conservative/libertarian thinkers of the past 200 to 250 years.

I recommend to his attention "Reflections on the Revolution in France," by Edmund Burke; "The Road to Serfdom," by F. A. Hayek; "God and Man at Yale," by William F. Buckley; and "The Conservative Mind," by Russell Kirk. If a book of a more recent vintage is desired, there is always "The Secret Knowledge," by David Mamet. I am sure that he will find all these works informative and enlightening, if information and enlightenment is what he truly seeks.

His present sources are at best second- or even third-hand rehashes of political talking points from the perspective of the Democrat left and provide no useful information about conservative thought.

Tom Chastain

Eagle-Vail