Letter: A concerned student | VailDaily.com

Letter: A concerned student

Wildlife population sizes are dwindling in this valley to the point where retired Colorado Parks and Wildlife officer Bill Andree says all we can do at this point is to maintain what we have. I understand that the value of wildlife and ecosystems are difficult numbers to crunch. A return on investment would be far more easy to calculate.

As a member of a governing body in Vail, the difficult equations need to be considered more carefully. Mayor Dave Chapin, you are not just the mayor of a town, but the steward to the land that you were elected to watch over. The same is true for every member of government and the citizens of Eagle County’s mountain communities. 

The bighorn sheep have never recovered in the Gore Range since the epic 2007-2008 winter season. Triumph Development has dedicated $100,000 to the Gore Range bighorn sheep, but the herd will not respond to money. This is a delicate native herd. The proposed mitigation of their migration course cannot undo the damage of destroying their winter habitat and will surely wipe them out for their population size is vulnerable. 

Voting for the construction of Booth Heights is to engage in unsustainable actions against Colorado wildlife and generations of mountain enthusiasts. However, the Planning and Environmental Commission made their decision and another habitat in Vail could be lost, but not without a fight.

I am incredibly proud to call this Valley my home after seeing the relentless actions of citizens to appeal this development. We choose to live here for the mountain and the serenity it offers, not for an antiquated development opportunity. My hope in writing this letter is to ask the next generation of passionate humans to show up on Tuesday, October 15, at town hall. The destruction of this habitat will not only affect residents of East Vail, but all who are proud to call this place home. 

Sunny Rae Frost

Avon