Letter: National Parks’ climate action plans haven’t disappeared; the format is being upgraded | VailDaily.com

Letter: National Parks’ climate action plans haven’t disappeared; the format is being upgraded

I read with interest the letter by Kay Delanoy of Eagle (“What happened to National Parks’ climate action plans?” Sunday, Dec. 24).

Under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the National Park Service, like all federal agencies, has a Jan. 18, 2018, deadline to make electronic information and technology accessible to people with disabilities.

As part of that process, we are updating PDF documents on nps.gov that are not yet accessible to all, including climate action plans for nearly 100 parks that were listed on a nps.gov webpage. Those noncompliant PDF documents are temporarily unavailable for download while we work to make them compliant with the revised accessibility standards. In the meantime, the PDF documents will be provided by email upon request.

The documents will be reposted once they are made accessible to people with disabilities. This can be complicated with large PDF files that are out of compliance. The website where the files were located includes instructions for requesting the documents in the meantime.

This is an ongoing, service-wide review affecting all parks and programs, thousands of documents and a wide range of topics.

A document or application is considered accessible if it meets certain technical criteria and can be used by people with disabilities. This includes access by people who are mobility impaired, blind, low vision, deaf, hard of hearing or who have cognitive impairments.

Accessibility features in Adobe Acrobat, Adobe Reader and in the portable document format (PDF) make it easier for people with disabilities to use PDF documents and forms, with and without the aid of assistive technology software and devices such as screen readers, screen magnifiers, text-to-speech software, speech recognition software, alternative input devices, Braille embossers and refreshable Braille displays.

Thank you,

Jeffrey G. Olson

Public affairs officer, National Park Service