Vail Daily letter: Teach more, supervise less | VailDaily.com

Vail Daily letter: Teach more, supervise less

The superintendent of Eagle County Schools, Jason E. Glass, recently observed, “the American approach to educator quality has been to throw the doors wide open in terms of who can become a teacher, lowering or removing completely the bar in terms of the pre-service training experience, scripting and mandating lessons and teaching and subjecting teachers to onerous and confusing performance evaluation systems designed to identify and weed out poor performers.” Admittedly, Glass asserts that the Eagle County School District avails itself of this “American approach” with regard to teacher qualifications. Ergo, get a license, then you are a “teacher” and can teach! Your experience, your knowledge of the subject matter of what you teach, your altruistic dedication to the profession and your universal approach to knowledge in general are all secondary to the agenda and regime imposed by government, including our local school district of which Glass is part.

“Government is not the solution, but the problem” (Reagan), what with its National Education Association dictated curricula of “one size fits all” for all levels and grades of pre-secondary education, of which the Eagle County School District is a part — to keep the federal funds flowing, you bend to the will of the secretary of education, the teachers’ unions, and, yes, to your own local school board. All this at the cost of not procuring quality teachers and enhancing the availability of a quality education for most of the students. The dismal tests scores in the fields of math and science are a part of the “costs” for which we foot in excessive taxes. The distortions and disingenuous “facts” in the fields of civics, history, humanities and economics are all costs we bear for the sake of political correctness, egalitarian progressiveness, and to maintain an entrenched and unvetted bureaucracy.

Superintendent Glass has recognized and acknowledged the nexus of the problem, but will he and the school board address and rectify it by taking an academic approach, or will they doggedly and slovenly adhere to the mandates spawned by Washington and the unions? Will these administrators eschew the dogma of licensing, and qualify teachers on the basis of subject matter knowledge, experience, dedication and results generated in the classrooms? Rather than further burdening the taxpayers with the incessant requests for more monies for infrastructure and administration at every turn of the election cycle, demonstrate to the public that what you are doing with what you already have is producing genuine results for the beneficiaries — the future generations of Americans. Ergo, will we have dumbed-down, subservient, and submissive generations to come, or will we inherit the truly educated, knowledgeable, and capable individuals that our youth would have become were they to have been offered different courses, and you to have taken a different tack ?

But, “there’s a method to his madness” (Hamlet), in that were Glass to continue on with this “American approach” in his calling he would become complicit in the degeneration of the collective intellect of future generations. For instance, he would take a child with a special, esoteric and mental potential, and pervert that individuality into a servile or “pigeon-holed” subject of a dictatorial regime, rather than the master of his own destiny and that of government itself. Imagine if government itself would be a servant of the people — how novel! Mr. Glass just might muse about becoming less of an “administrator” or “superintendent,” and strive to be a renaissance himself in his teaching profession — teach more and supervise less! Perhaps this would be the needed change to which he alludes.

Fredric Butler