What to know for Rockies home opener — whether you’re going or not | VailDaily.com

What to know for Rockies home opener — whether you’re going or not

The first pitch is at 2:10 p.m.

JOHN WENZEL | The Denver Post
Grounds crew workers toil to prepare the field as the Colorado Rockies host the Los Angeles Dodgers in a baseball game Friday, April 5, 2019, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Coors Field

Baseball is a slow game compared to most sports, but the action inside Coors Field will seem positively breathless on Friday next to the logjam created by tens of thousands of fans streaming into Lower Downtown for the Colorado Rockies’ home opener against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Long before the first pitch at 2:10 p.m., LoDo bars and restaurants will throw open their doors with food and drink specials as live bands, street vendors and others add to the circus-like atmosphere. That also means congestion around the sold-out Coors Field (capacity 50,000), with slower traffic, less parking and other headaches for downtown workers and visitors.

The National Weather Service forecasted a high of 68 degrees with mostly sunny skies and a slight chance for thundershowers on Friday afternoon, with calm wind from the east/southeast around 6 mph.

In terms of street closures, the big one to watch all weekend will be Blake Street between 20th and 22nd streets — the most heavily walked route into Coors Field — according to a spokeswoman for Denver’s Office of Special Events. Expect those blocks to be shut down at 9 a.m. Friday and reopened after pedestrian traffic clears in the afternoon, likely after the game ends. (They also shut down three hours before most games in general.)

The Rockies’ annual Opening Day Fest returns to 21st and Blake streets with family-friendly activities from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, which will draw fans to that corner. The city is not reporting any other major closures or detours for the weekend, but if you’re familiar with GPS-driven smartphone apps such as Google Maps or Waze — both of which provide real-time traffic information — keep them handy.

Read the full story via The Denver Post.