| VailDaily.com

Shiffrin skis to eighth place in World Cup Finals slalom

Mikaela Shiffrin arrives at the finish area of the World Cup Finals slalom in Meribel, France on Saturday
Alessandro Trovati/AP

Relaxed and fast.

It’s hard to know the exact mantra Mikaela Shiffrin brought to Saturday’s World Cup Finals slalom, but with the pressure off after securing the overall title Thursday, it is a decent prognostication.

In the first run, it was also an accurate assessment of her skiing. Unfortunately, the six-time slalom discipline winner was behind the course the whole way down her second run, struggling to find her usual snappiness around the gates to finish in eighth place in the last slalom of the season.

Andreja Slokar of Slovenia, in just her 31st career World Cup start, earned a surprise victory, the country’s first in the event since 2014 and her first individual World Cup win ever.

The anticipated weekend showdown between Petra Vlhová and Shiffrin never manifested itself as the Edwards resident was runner-up in Thursday’s super-G and the Slovakian Olympic slalom gold medalist failed to score. The result locked up a fourth career overall globe for the 27-year-old American.

On soft snow and under sunny skis, Shiffrin skied to the fifth-fastest first run down the Roc de Fer course, 0.66 seconds behind leader Lena Dürr, while Vlhová was fourth with 0.48 to make up in the second leg. Winner of five of the eight slaloms this season, Vlhová clinched the World Cup slalom title before the Beijing Olympics.

Just like in China, Dürr and Michelle Gisin were 1-2 after the first run. At the Olympics, they wound up out of the medals. Making her 178th career World Cup start, Dürr was looking to win her first ever World Cup slalom.

Slovakia's Petra Vlhova speeds down the course during the World Cup Finals slalom in Meribel, France on Saturday.
Marco Trovati/AP

In her second run along a course set up by coach Mike Day, Shiffrin lacked her usual spring through the turns and appeared mechanical, as if she were still working through her slalom struggles from the Olympics. She lost time at each sector, ending the run 1.48 seconds back. Her second run was the just the 19th fastest of the day.

“In past races I’ve shown not much speed in these softer conditions,” commented Shiffrin to U.S. Ski and Snowboard.

“It’s something I didn’t have time to figure out before now, but now we have something I can really work on over the summer if we want to try and improve a bit on this kind of softer snow.”

Shiffrin is looking forward to tomorrow’s giant slalom.

“I’m optimistic; I think it’s a chance for me to again try to work on some things in softer snow,“ she said to U.S. Ski and Snowboard.

“Normally I won’t risk something unless I feel that there is something to get back from the surface. But I’m also watching all the other competitors when they’re skiing really well on these kinds of conditions, their movements and how they’re able to perform and I’m hopeful that I have the chance to perform like that as well.”

As the course deteriorated in the spring-like conditions, Vlhova struggled in her second run as well, falling to third, 0.81 seconds back. The corn snow skiing wasn’t great for Dürr either, as she skied the 16th-fastest second run to finish second overall (+0.48).

In front of a well-traveled Slovakian fan-base, a still jubilant Vlhová expressed satisfaction regarding her overall season.

“It’s really important because before the season we set the goal to achieve a small globe for slalom and we made it,” she told FIS reporters when asked what the season title meant.

“It’s amazing. It was a really tough season for me, but I have everything. I am Olympic champion, now I have small globe for slalom — it’s something amazing.”

Shiffrin’s 2021-2022 season successes

* Clinched 4th career overall crystal globe (tied for second-most of all time)

* Claimed 74th World Cup victory (third-most all time)

* 14 podiums (five wins) across three disciplines

* Broke record for most wins in a single discipline (slalom – 47)

In the men’s giant slalom on Saturday, River Radamus dropped seven places after his second run to finish his day in 20th. Radamus finished 15th in the giant slalom season standings, with 147 points. Marco Odermatt won the GS globe handily with 720 points, 267 points more than second-placer Henrik Kristoffersen

The women’s World Cup season ends Sunday with a giant slalom while the men finish with a slalom.

Mikaela Shiffrin speeds down the course during the World Cup Finals slalom in Meribel, France on Saturday.
Alessandro Trovati/AP

Mikaela Shiffrin and River Radamus place fourth in final Olympic Alpine event

Mikaela Shiffrin (right) of the USA defeats Rebeka Jancova of Slovakia in the first round of the mixed team parallel.
Michael Kappeler/AP Images

While the casual sports fan might assume the Olympics always represent who sits atop a sport, those involved know how fickle the quadrennial event can be when it comes to producing expected results.

“It’s not easy to win, ever,” Mikaela Shiffrin stated in a promotional video on the Olympics website prior to the Games.

The prescient words from the three-time World Cup overall champion have proven painful over the last two-and-a-half weeks. On Sunday, however, one more chance was given to the 26-year-old to win. Her fellow Edwards-based teammate, River Radamus, did everything in his power to get the local pair on the podium, but in the end, there was no pot of gold at the end of the Rainbow course at the Yanquin Alpine Skiing Center.

After 25 mph wind gusts blasting the frigid slopes in Beijing forced Saturday’s event to be moved to Sunday, Shiffrin was given an extra day before her sixth and final event of the Games, joining Slovakian Petra Vlhova as the only athletes to have contested every Alpine event at a single Olympics.

Shiffrin was hoping to tie Julia Mancuso for the most total Olympic medals by a female American Alpine skier. Radamus, whose fourth place in the giant slalom stands as the best individual Vail snowsport athlete performance in Beijing, was also hungry to step up one place and earn his first career Olympic medal. Both joined the powerhouse U.S. squad of Paula Moltzan, Tommy Ford, Luke Winters and A.J. Hurt.

The mixed team event, new in 2018, involves teams of two men and two women going head-to-head in a knockout format. Individuals race down identical runs, with winners earning a point for their team. After all four athletes have competed, any ties for advancing to the next round are broken by total aggregate time.

Switzerland took the title in the Pyeongchang debut, with Austria in silver and Norway bronze.

The Americans were flawless in the first round, winning 3-1 over the Vlhova-less Slovakians (the slalom gold medalist departed the Games early because of injury). Starting with Shiffrin, who used a great start to immediately gap Rebeka Jancova and cruise to a 0.64 second victory, the U.S. followed with a Radamus win and a Paula Moltzan 1.45-second drubbing to go up 3-0 before Ford narrowly lost.

In the quarterfinal, Moltzan led off, running in the blue course, which ran safer and faster all day. The Minnesota-native, who grew up skiing on Buck Hill, just like Lindsey Vonn, did her job, defeating the decorated Federica Brignone by 0.56 seconds.

River Radamus skied flawlessly in the mixed team parallel event on Sunday in Beijing.
Alessandro Trovati/AP photo

Luca de Aliprandini, the best Italian skier, went off the course against Tommy Ford, earning the Americans a surprising second point. Up 2-0, Shiffrin, on the slower red course, lost to Marta Bassino by just 0.02 seconds, putting the pressure on Radamus. The Vail skier delivered, defeating Alex Vinatzer by 0.76 seconds.

In one semifinal, Norway, fresh off an upset of France, battled Austria, eventually falling to the Alpine powerhouse on time.

In the other, Shiffrin opened against Lena Duerr of Germany. On the red course, the American barreled out of the gate, taking an early lead, but Duerr gained separation on the seemingly advantageous bottom drop specific to the blue course, winning by 0.10 seconds. Radamus evened things up, winning his heat by 0.76 seconds despite a slight fumble out of the gate, embracing Shiffrin at the bottom.

Paula Moltzan leads Petra Hromcova of Slovakia during the mixed team parallel skiing event at the 2022 Winter Olympics on Sunday.
Luca Bruno/AP photo

Both Moltzan and Germany’s Emma Eicher fell in their dual, but Eicher made it farther down the course, earning the point and a 2-to-1 lead. After Tommy Ford lost in the fourth run, hopes for a medal hinged on a win against Norway in the bronze medal competition.

Moltzan bounced back right away, defeating Maria Therese Tviberg to give the U.S. a 1-0 lead. Norway’s Fabian Wilkens Solheim defeated Tommy Ford by 0.94 seconds to tie things up as Shiffrin waited to go, the pressure on once again. Skiing aggressively, Shiffrin couldn’t overcome the red course curse, putting the Americans down 2-1.

In their final chance, Norway’s Timon Haugan fell before the final gate. To his left and in the lead anyway, Radamus did everything he possibly could, skiing aggressively to finish in 24.04. With the tiebreak coming down to the team with the faster female time, owned by Norway’s Thea Louise Stjernesund, it was Norway winding up with the bronze.

“It’s heavy. Those are the sort of moments you work your whole life for,” Radamus said about his final run to NBC.

“Falling short like that stings, but I thought I really focused well and attacked as hard as I could.”

“I get that people will say we came up short, but to have this depth on our team, competing in a European-dominated sport, all of us, with these guys skiing so strongly,” Shiffrin said, pausing to address Radamus directly on the broadcast.

“River, we’re watching you at the bottom there. The fact that you were skiing so strongly and even gave us hope — that’s the biggest win you could ever give us.”

“My teammates are what carried me through these Olympics,” she stated.

In the final, Austria defeated Germany on time to claim their first gold in the event.

Tess Johnson places third at Tremblant, Canada World Cup mogul event

Tess Johnson competes in the qualifications of a freestyle skiing World Cup moguls event in Mont Tremblant, Quebec, Friday, Jan. 7, 2022.
Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP

World No. 1 Jakara Anthony opened the door, and Ski and Snowboard Club Vail athletes Tess Johnson and Elizabeth Lemley put their proverbial feet in it.

Competing in her first career World Cup, the 15-year-old Lemley qualified for the super final and finished as the second American and fourth overall, while teammate Tess Johnson inched closer to a second U.S. Olympic team bid with her second podium finish of the season, placing third.

Anri Kawamura, center, of Japan, celebrates her win Friday with second-place finisher Perrine Laffont, left, of France, and third-place finisher Tess Johnson, right, of the United States, in the women's World Cup freestyle moguls skiing event at Mont Tremblant, Quebec.
Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP

“I’m feeling really happy, I just had so much fun today, and I’m really proud to land on the podium after a stressful Christmas and only two days of training,” Johnson told reporters at the finish line. “I took it one run at a time and just focused my attention toward my queues. I also want to congratulate Liz for such an incredible debut. We were only 0.01 points apart, so in a way I share this success with her. It’s always so fun to ski in a Supers with teammates.”

Lemley, who earned two second-place finishes in the individual moguls and won the dual moguls event at U.S. Selections in Winter Park in December, was first to go in the super final and posted a score of 79.24.

“I had a ton of fun today,” Lemley told U.S. Ski and Snowboard.

“All of my mental thoughts were really good. I think the course was fabulous and it’s always great to ski a nice course. Everything about (today) was fun, and I just felt really strong.”

Anthony, fresh off her sweep of the dual and individual moguls at the most recent World Cup in Alpe d’Huez, France, was late to her landing off of the first jump. She couldn’t recover, and her score of 77.40, as well as American Olivia Giaccio’s 77.04, had the youngster in pole position with just four athletes remaining.

Those four would ski cleanly, however, with Japan’s Anri Kawamura posting a winning score of 81.76 on the final run, besting France’s Perrine Laffont by 0.33 points and kicking the World Cup rookie off the podium. Johnson’s second third-place finish in a row could be significant in the Beijing Olympic selection process.

Jaelin Kauf and Hannah Soar have already secured two of the objective Olympic spots on account of their second- and sixth-place rankings, respectively, on the FIS points list. The final objective selection, to be determined by an athlete’s best finish at one of the designated tryout events, currently belongs to Giaccio courtesy of her victory in the Ruka, Finland, opener Dec. 4. Johnson needs a win Saturday in Tremblant or in one of the two events in Deer Valley, Utah next weekend, to force a tie with Giaccio for the final objective spot.

If both athletes were to possess a first-place finish, the second-highest point result from one of the mogul tryout events would be used. Johnson now has two third-place finishes, while Giaccio’s second-best finish is her sixth-place from Friday.

SSCV’s Kai Owens, who also has a top-three finish in a qualifying event (she was third in Ruka, Finland, on Dec. 4), did not compete in Canada.

On the men’s side, no athlete was ranked in the Dec. 14 FIS points list, meaning the three selections will come from athletes who acquire at least a podium finish in one of the qualifying events. So far, the best result in one of the designated events is a fourth-place finish by Cole McDonald at the Alpe d’Huez, France dual moguls event.

According to the selection procedures, “If no U.S. athlete has had one (1) top three result, in the Tryout Events, then any remaining quota slots will be evaluated under Discretionary Selection Procedures in Section 2 or the Remaining Team Nomination Criteria in Section 3.”

Dylan Walczyk, another SSCV alumnus, competed in Tremblant as well, placing 11th as the second American, behind Nick Page in seventh. In the current World Cup overall moguls standings, Walczyk is now the fourth American, 16th overall, just seven points behind of Page, who had trailed him before the competition but now sits in 14th.

Three more tryout mogul events remain: one in Tremblant, Canada, Saturday, and two more in Deer Valley, Utah, next weekend. The Team USA Olympics team nomination is set for Jan. 18.

I-70 reopened eastbound in Eagle

I-70 eastbound at milemarker 147 has reopened in Eagle after an hour-long safety closure.

Snowy conditions have made for slippery roads on the eve of Thanksgiving. As travelers come into town and skiers hit the mountains, motorists are advised to drive with caution and keep an eye out for hazards.

 

I-70 through Glenwood Canyon reopens Tuesday afternoon following flood warning

Interstate 70 is under another safety closure in both directions through Glenwood Canyon Tuesday afternoon, with a flash flood warning in effect.

A flood watch was issued earlier Tuesday and was upgraded to a warning shortly after 3 p.m., with heavy rains predicted above the Grizzly Creek burn scar.

The closure is in place between milemarkers 87 (Rifle) and 133 (Dotsero) eastbound, and between 133 and 116 westbound, according to a Colorado Department of Transportation news alert.

“The safety closure is in place to protect motorists from the potential of flash floods, mudslides, rockfall or other hazards that can be triggered by heavy rains at the location of Grizzly Creek burn scar area,” CDOT said in the release.

The closure will remain in place through the duration of the Flash Flood Warning, which is forecast to end at 5 p.m., CDOT said.

“If a debris flow or mudslide occurs, motorists should be aware that I-70 will be closed for a longer period of time to allow maintenance crews to clear the highway.”

In that case, motorists are advised to take the northern alternate route through Steamboat Springs via state Highways 13, 131 and 9 and U.S. 40, or they may wait out the Flash Flood Warning and safety closure.

This is a developing story and will be updated.

UPDATE: Cost of 12-day-old Sylvan Fire nearly $5M

6 p.m. update: EAGLE — The Sylvan Fire is on its heels, but it’s certainly not finished nearly two weeks since igniting south of Eagle in the White River National Forest near the popular Sylvan Lake State Park.

For a large wildfire that quickly became the top priority incident in the Rocky Mountain region due to threats to watersheds and power lines, things have mostly broken the right way.

“Between the weather and being able to get resources when we needed them, things went very well,” said Michelle Kelly, a public information officer with the Rocky Mountain Fire District. “There was more good work out there today. The rain didn’t hit until later. They’ve been able to get direct hand line and have been working to get some more containment. There have been no real issues. They’re not finding a lot of heat still out there.”

Assorted trucks and trailers are set up at a camp near Sylvan Lake State Park. The Sylvan Fire is 58% contained and more rain fell on the fire Friday.
Special to the Daily

As the weather warms up and the area dries out, however, that could change.

“They’ll keep watching it,” Kelly said. “As we move into more of a drying trend, we’ll have a presence out there.”

Earlier this week, Rob Powell, the operations section chief on the fire, called the rain a blessing for Eagle County in a Facebook video. He described the fire activity as “smoldering, skunking around due to the rain.”

More rain fell Friday, but Kelly said some of the heavier precipitation seen throughout the valley missed the fire area.

The fire’s size remains at 3,792 acres on Friday, nearly six square miles. It is 58% contained. There are 389 personnel working the fire, according to the most recent Thursday update on fire’s Incident Information System page, down from a peak of 425.

Moving in, moving out

Those personnel numbers will continue to decline as the Rocky Mountain Type I Incident Management Team turns over control of the fire to a local team by 7 p.m. Saturday.

Kelly described that transition in detail Friday.

“We go through and evaluate what processes we would recommend, operations ideas, logistics for the firefighters that are continuing to work here, as well as recommendations for getting information to the public about the fire,” she said. “We just had our transition meeting, where we get into a brief history of the fire and what the team is leaving in place.”

She also said the local Type III team taking over the fire shadows the Type-I team leading up to the transition, which is set to take place at 7 p.m. Saturday.

Costs add up quickly

The cost of the fire, as of Friday, was estimated at $4.9 million and counting. Kelly said the bill will be footed by U.S. Forest Service funds, since the fire is burning in the White River National Forest.

That covers everything from the money paid to personnel on the ground to those in the air, as well as equipment costs, food costs, lodging costs, gas, and anything else you can think of when it comes to such a large-scale effort.

“Everything is accounted for,” Kelly said. “The finance section tracks every order number and everything that’s ordered is paid for, every person that’s working, the food we eat, the lodging.”

One of those order numbers: the large machinery that has been ordered to clear out some of the most hard-to-reach areas of the fire, particularly on the southeast corner of the blaze where Kelly said the terrain wasn’t safe to send in hand crews.

One of the pieces of logging machinery being used is a Timbco feller buncher, which grabs onto a tree and brings it down with a hot saw. The work is fast, and other equipment is used to grab the fallen timber and deck the logs for hauling away.

“Up near the powerline road, down in that area, it’s unsafe, full of snags and a lot of heavy timber that’s real dense,” Kelly said. “The equipment has a cage, so if a tree falls, the likelihood of it smacking an operator is very small.”

Firefighters ask for the public’s support in steering clear of the area. There is still fire and firefighting activity throughout the area.
Special to the Daily

As firefighters continue to manage the ongoing fire activity, the team managing the fire asks that out of the interest of public and firefighter safety, people continue to stay out of the area.

Sylvan Fire at a glance


Location: Eagle County, White River National Forest in Sylvan Lake State Park, 16 miles south of Eagle

Size: 3,792 acres

Fuel: Spruce-Fir

Cause: Suspected lightning, still under investigation

Date of Ignition: June 20 around 3:15 PM

Firefighting Personnel: 394

Containment: 50%

Though lightning is suspected as cause of the fire, the incident is still under investigation.

For the latest information about pre-evacuation or evacuation notices or fire restrictions on non-Federal lands, visit ECemergency.org. Officials are also reminding the public that wildfires are a No Drone Zone, and if you fly, they can’t.

UPDATE: Sylvan Fire now 50% contained

8 p.m. update: Ten days in, the firefighters working the Sylvan Fire south of Eagle are halfway to putting black line around the entire fire.

With containment continuing to increase in recent days, reaching 50% by Wednesday evening, the Rocky Mountain Type I Incident Team assigned to area plans to scale back firefighting personnel by the end of the week.

As of Wednesday , there were 425 personnel assigned to the wildfire, which is just under 6 square miles in size.

Abundant atmospheric moisture, coupled with an unsettled atmosphere, led to another round of scattered showers and a few isolated thunderstorms Wednesday afternoon and evening across the region, according to Wednesday night update.

Thursday is expected to be very similar to Wednesday, with scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms in the daytime forecast, along with seasonably cool temperatures and elevated humidity.

Daytime highs will increase slightly on Friday, along with minimum humidity values decreasing.

The incident team’s fire behavior analyst reported that even heavy fuels in the area are starting to show a slight increase in moisture content.

Smoke and burned trees from the Sylvan Fire. After 10 days, 50% of the fire has been contained.
Special to the Daily

This has helped “subdue fire behavior,” which is now limited to “creeping and smoldering.”

Temperatures are expected to rise this weekend but the chance of rain and damp weather will remain, playing in the favor of further fire containment.

The two branches of the incident management team have been working tirelessly to establish more black lines around the fire’s perimeter.

One of the divisions assigned within these two branches has been almost entirely contained and firefighters are working to establish a line along the fire’s perimeter South of Sylvan Lake where terrain allows.

Firefighters have also completed a containment line along the Mount Thomas Trail ridgeline and down into the drainage basin.

On Wednesday, additional fire crews were sent to the northwestern part of the fire, which has been identified as a priority area for laying down more fire line.

While rain has been helpful the last few days, “rain isn’t going to put this fire out,” said public information officer Tracy LeClair on Tuesday. LeClair added that heavy fuels in the fire area are still quite dry and can still burn. And, LeClair said, the rain has actually made building fire line more difficult, because the fine fuels — grasses and other small plants — can’t be burned to help create fire lines.

With more warm weather in the extended forecast, LeClair said some areas may burn within the fire’s perimeter.

Another problem is the steep, densely wooded terrain in the fire perimeter. Those areas are difficult for firefighters to reach. In fact, LeClair said it’s going to require getting heavy equipment into some areas to clear the way for firefighting crews.

While firefighters continue to work, LeClair said fire and law enforcement officials keep hearing about hikers and backpackers in the closed-off areas of the forest.

“We really need people to stay out of there,” LeClair said. “Not just for hikers’ safety but also for the safety of firefighters.”

Sylvan Fire at a glance


Location: Eagle County, White River National Forest in Sylvan Lake State Park, 16 miles south of Eagle

Size: 3,792 acres

Fuel: Spruce-Fir

Cause: Suspected lightning, still under investigation

Date of Ignition: June 20 around 3:15 PM

Firefighting Personnel: 425

Containment: 50%

Though lightning is suspected as cause of the fire, the incident is still under investigation.

For the latest information about pre-evacuation or evacuation notices or fire restrictions on non-Federal lands, visit ECemergency.org. Officials are also reminding the public that wildfires are a No Drone Zone, and if you fly, they can’t.

Vail Mountain School girls soccer falls in 3A semis

The Gore Rangers come together under the lights in Greenwood Village after their loss Wednesday in the 3A state semifinal round.
Special to the Daily

A dream season for Vail Mountain School’s girls soccer team ended in the semifinal round of the 3A playoffs Wednesday at the Stutler Bowl in Greenwood Village. The Gore Rangers finally met their match against a talented Colorado Academy team in a 4-0 loss.

The Mustangs scored two first-half goals and tacked on two more in the second half to advance to the 3A title game while holding the Gore Rangers scoreless throughout in a game that kicked off at 7:30 p.m. under the lights.

The Gore Rangers were the 3A tournament’s No. 3 seed coming in, while the Mustangs were seeded No. 11, but you can throw out the records in the playoffs — especially when it comes to Western Slope teams playing Denver teams.

Vail Mountain School finishes the season 12-1 after dominating its first-round playoff opponent, DSST: Green Valley Ranch, 8-0, before winning an overtime thriller Saturday at home over The Academy from Westminster, 2-1, off Stella Stone’s golden goal.

This story will be updated

GoPro Mountain Games will return to Vail for 2021

Photo Courtesy Vail Valley Foundation

The GoPro Mountain Games are on for 2021, the Vail Valley Foundation announced Friday morning. The event will take place June 10-13.

“We are BACK, and we could not be more excited to bring some joy, vitality and positivity into people’s lives in the fresh air and sunshine of this beautiful mountain setting,” said GoPro Mountain Games Event Director Dave Dressman. “It takes months of planning and many, many key partners to make this event happen. The support we have received from our sponsors, the town of Vail and Vail Resorts is remarkable, and it speaks to the power of the Mountain Games brand. We have looked at this from every angle and we feel confident we have a strong baseline plan to execute a safe, high-level, athlete-focused GoPro Mountain Games this June.”

An annual tradition of more than a decade, the GoPro Games were canceled in 2020 due to concerns over the coronavirus. But after the hiatus, this year’ event will return with competition in whitewater, mountain biking, road biking, fishing, trail running, DockDogs, disc golf, yoga, a photo competition, three nights of GoPro Mountains of Music from the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater (livestreamed and limited in-person capacity) and more.

Athlete registration is expected to open April 9. Learn more at mountaingames.com.

An athlete focus

The event will not be a cut-and-paste of years past, but instead will focus on the athletes, offering a core set of participatory events, substantial prize money, music, art, and a daily livestream and multi-media experience for those that are not able to attend in person.

In addition to being given a safe platform to compete in Vail for significant prizes, athletes will also receive presale access to the GoPro Mountains of Music concerts and other perks throughout the event.

“We know our athletes have missed the event and the opportunity to compete together in our mountain community. Allowing a safe return for our athletes is of utmost importance to us, so we have built a plan that can take place under current public health guidelines; but we are optimistic that we will be able to adapt quickly as the situation improves and public health orders allow,” said Sarah Franke, the vice president of marketing and operations for the Vail Valley Foundation. “To that end, we will continue to focus on what can be done to ensure the event is as fun, energetic and celebratory as possible.’”

The Vail Valley Foundation will announce more information, updates, and details as the event draws near.

Athletics events will include:

Bike

  • Road bike time trial
  • TIAA Bank XC Mountain Bike
  • TIAA Bank Kids’ Bike Race
  • Bosch eBike Challenge

Fly Fishing

  • YETI 2 Fly X-Stream
  • YETI Catch Wars

Kayak

  • Pacifico Gore Creek Kayak Challenge
  • GMC Down River Kayak Sprint
  • GMC Kayak Freestyle

Raft

  • Pacifico Down River R2 Raft Sprint

SUP

  • YETI Down River SUP Sprint

Dog

  • Orijen DockDogs Outdoor Big Air*
  • Orijen DockDogs Extreme Vertical*
  • Orijen DockDogs Speed Retrieve*
  • Dueling Dogs

*This year’s DockDogs events will be classified as a National Championship, with increased prize money

Trail running

  • Adidas Terrex 10K Spring Runoff
  • Nature Valley Après 5K
  • Rocky Dog Trail Run
  • Pepi’s Face-Off presented by JUNK Brands

Disc Golf

  • Mountain Masters Disc Golf

Yoga

  • Limited capacity, physically distanced, outdoors

Art

  • GoPro Mountain Click Photo Competition

Previously held events that will not be a part of this year’s event are: Slackline; World Cup climbing competition; select whitewater events, including Steep Creek Championship; and the Ultimate Mountain Challenge.

Spectators and physical distancing

In-person spectating opportunities are likely to be limited or unavailable due to physical distancing requirements, but organizers are aware that the public health landscape may change as the event draws near.

The GoPro Mountain Games typically feature sponsor tents and activations from more than 140 sponsors, known as “Gear Town,” however that will not be the case in 2021. Additionally, some competition venues will be eliminated altogether, and others will be moved, in order to create firm boundaries where capacity and physical distancing can be managed.

Details on COVID-19 protocols at the event will be made public closer to the start of the Games. The Vail Valley Foundation is working closely and in conjunction with public health officials to ensure that the event operates within guidelines.

Confirmed changes include:

  • Removing/eliminating Gear Town and sponsor activations & tents
  • Elimination of all Lionshead village activations
  • Moving DockDogs out of Lionshead
  • Elimination of the Steep Creek venue in Red Cliff
  • Elimination of climbing venue in Mountain Plaza
  • Elimination of VIP area/access

The Town of Vail and its hotels, restaurants, and miles of outdoor hiking and biking trails will still be open and active during the GoPro Mountain Games.

Music, livestreaming, and virtual events

For those who may not be able to compete but want to connect and engage with the GoPro Mountain Games, the Vail Valley Foundation is raising the bar for this year’s event in several ways:

  • The introduction of a daily live show during the event in partnership with Outside TV
  • A GoPro-camera livestreamed concert series from the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater
  • Virtual events, contests and activities leading up to and during the event

Updates: Congressional leaders reconvene to certify Biden victory after mob cleared from Capitol

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Congress’ tally of the Electoral College vote won by Joe Biden (all times local):

9:15 p.m.: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress’ certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s election win will show the world it won’t back down.

Pelosi made her comments as the House reconvened after being shut down for hours Wednesday by unruly pro-Trump protesters. She said that every four years the ritual provides an example to the world of American democracy.

Pelosi says, “Despite the shameful actions of today, we will still do so, we will be part of a history that shows the world what America is made of.”

Pelosi, a Roman Catholic, noted that Wednesday is the feast of the Epiphany and prayed that the violence would be “an epiphany to heal” for the country.

9:10 pm.: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is sending 1,000 members of the state’s National Guard to Washington, D.C., to help “the peaceful transition of presidential power.”

Cuomo, a Democrat, said 1,000 troops would be sent for up to two weeks at the request of U.S. National Guard officials. It comes after a mob of President Donald Trump’s supporters rampaged through the U.S. Capitol.

Cuomo said in a statement Wednesday: “For 244 years, the cornerstone of our democracy has been the peaceful transfer of power, and New York stands ready to help ensure the will of the American people is carried out, safely and decisively.”

They will join law enforcement from Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey who are also coming to D.C.’s aid.

The president’s supporters incited chaos in a protest over a transfer of power to President-elect Joe Biden. Trump convinced them that he was cheated out of a victory by rampant, widespread voter fraud, a false claim.

8:55 p.m.: Multiple Republican senators have reversed course and now say they won’t object to congressional certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

Their change of heart came after a violent mob stormed the U.S. Capitol earlier Wednesday and interrupted their proceedings. One person was fatally shot.

Sens. Steve Daines of Montana, Mike Braun of Indiana and Kelly Loeffler of Georgia all said in light of the violence they would stand down from planned objections to Biden’s win.

Lawmakers gathered to certify the Electoral College votes from each state were forced to evacuate after an angry mob of Trump supporters descended on the Capitol. Loeffler said that the “violence, the lawlessness, and siege of the halls of Congress” were a “direct attack” on the “sanctity of the American democratic process.”

All three had previously signed on to Trump’s false claims of widespread voter fraud to explain his defeat. Loeffler has just days left in her term. She lost her Senate race to Democrat Raphael Warnock earlier Wednesday.

8:45 p.m.: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says Congress “will not be deterred” in confirming the results of the presidential election hours after supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol.

The Republican leader reopened the Senate late Wednesday vowing to finish confirming the Electoral College for President-elect Joe Biden. It was interrupted earlier in the way when rioters breached the security perimeter and clashed with law enforcement before disrupting Congress’ tallying of the Electoral College votes. One person was fatally shot.

McConnell says demonstrators “tried to disrupt our democracy. They failed.”

McConnell plans to keep the Senate in session Wednesday to finish confirming the results.

Trump has repeatedly told his supporters that the November election was stolen from him, even though that is not true. He reiterated the claim in a video filmed as his demonstrators were storming the Capitol.

8:35 p.m.: Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer says President Donald Trump “bears a great deal of the blame” after a mob loyal to him stormed the U.S. Capitol.

As the Senate reconvened to count electoral votes that will confirm Democrat Joe Biden’s win, Schumer said that Jan. 6, 2021, will “live forever in infamy” and will be a stain on the democracy.

Schumer said the events “did not happen spontaneously.”

He said Wednesday: “The president, who promoted conspiracy theories that motivated these thugs, the president, who exhorted them to come to our nation’s capital, egged them on.”

Trump has falsely claimed that there was widespread fraud in the election to explain away his defeat.

Schumer says the protesters should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

8:20 p.m.: Former President Barack Obama says history will rightly remember the violence at the Capitol as a moment of great dishonor and shame for the nation.

Angry supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in a chaotic protest aimed at thwarting a peaceful transfer of power.

Obama say the violence was “incited by a sitting president” who baselessly lied about the outcome of the presidential election. He has convinced his supporters that he lost the election to President-elect Joe Biden only because Democrats cheated, a false claim.

Obama says it should not have come as a surprise, and that for two months “a political party and its accompanying media ecosystem has too often been unwilling to tell their followers the truth.”

He says “their fantasy narrative has spiraled further and further from reality, and it builds upon years of sown resentments. Now we’re seeing the consequences, whipped up into a violent crescendo.”

8:10 p.m.: The Senate has resumed debating the Republican challenge against Democrat Joe Biden’s presidential election victory, more than six hours after pro-Trump mobs attacked the Capitol and forced lawmakers to flee.

Scores of Republican representatives and 13 GOP senators had planned to object Wednesday to the electoral votes of perhaps six states that backed Biden. It was unclear whether those objections would continue in light of the day’s violent events.

President Donald Trump has falsely insisted that the election was marred by fraud and that he actually won. He reiterated those claims in remarks to thousands of protesters outside the White House early Wednesday and goaded them to march to the Capitol, which many of them did.

The mayhem had forced the House and Senate to abruptly end the day’s debates and flee to safety under the protection of police. And it prompted bipartisan outrage as many lawmakers blamed Trump for fostering the violence.

8:05 p.m.: Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who resigned in protest over President Donald Trump’s Syria policies, blamed the president for the violence at the U.S. Capitol.

In a sharp rebuke Wednesday, Mattis said the violence was fomented by Trump, who has used the presidency “to destroy trust in our election and to poison our respect for fellow citizens.”

His written statement concluded, “Our Constitution and our Republic will overcome this stain and We the People will come together again in our never-ending effort to form a more perfect Union, while Mr. Trump will deservedly be left a man without a country.”

Mattis, a retired four-star Marine general who stepped down as Pentagon chief in December 2018, had an embattled relationship with Trump, but largely remained publicly quiet and avoided direct criticism. Since he left the job, however, he has been more openly derisive of Trump, including a pubilc condemnation of the president’s heavy-handed use of military force to quell protests near the White House last June.

7:55 p.m.: Stephanie Grisham, chief of staff and press secretary for first lady Melania Trump, has resigned following violent protests at the U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump.

Grisham says in a statement Wednesday that it was an “honor” to serve the country in the White House and be part of he first lady’s “mission” to help children.

Grisham was one of Trump’s longest serving aides, having joined the campaign in 2015. She served as the White House press secretary and never held a press briefing.

Wednesday’s violent occupation of the U.S. Capitol by the president’s supporters sparked renewed conversations inside the White House about mass resignations by mid-level aides who are responsible for operations of the office of the president.

Two people familiar with the conversations said the aides were torn between fears of what more would happen if they left and a desire to register their disgust with their boss. They spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal matters.

7:45 p.m.: The Republican National Committee says it strongly condemns the violence at the Capitol, adding that the violent scenes “do not represent acts of patriotism, but an attack on our country and its founding principles.”

The RNC is responsible for developing and promoting the Republican political platform. Its statement condemning the violence came hours after Republican President Donald Trump baselessly complained that the election was stripped away “from great patriots.” He went on to tell them to “go home with love & in peace.”

The group’s communications director, Michael Ahrens, says, “What happened today was domestic terrorism.”

He says to see the U.S. flag used “in the name of unfounded conspiracy theories is a disgrace to the nation, and every decent American should be disgusted by it.”

Trump had encouraged his supporters to come to Washington to fight Congress’ formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden’s victory over him, citing false claims of voter fraud. He held a rally earlier Wednesday and urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to “get rid of the weak Congress people.”

7:40 p.m.: Former President Bill Clinton says the attack on the U.S. Capitol was fueled over four years of “poison politics” and lit by President Donald Trump.

Clinton said in a statement Wednesday night that the riot at the Capitol resulted from a combination of deliberate disinformation that created distrust in the system and pit Americans against one another.

He wrote, “The match was lit by Donald Trump and his most ardent enablers, including many in Congress, to overturn the results of an election he lost.”

His wife, Hillary Clinton, lost a bitter election to Trump in 2016 and conceded to him immediately. Trump has refused to accept his defeat by Democrat Joe Biden in November and is trying to cast him as an illegitimate president.

Trump had encouraged his supporters to come to Washington to fight Congress’ formal approval of Biden’s win. He held a rally earlier Wednesday and urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to “get rid of the weak Congress people” and saying, “get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength.”

7:20 p.m.: A West Virginia lawmaker took video of himself and other supporters of President Donald Trump rushing into the U.S. Capitol after they breached the security perimeter.

In the video by Republican Del. Derrick Evans, later deleted from his social media page, he is shown wearing a helmet and clamoring at the door to breach the building in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday.

“We’re in! Keep it moving, baby!” he said in a packed doorway amid Trump followers holding flags and complaining of being pepper sprayed. Once inside, Evans could be seen on video milling around the Capitol Rotunda, where historical paintings depict the republic’s founding, and yelled, “No vandalizing!”

State House of Delegates Speaker Roger Hanshaw said Evans will need to “answer to his constituents and colleagues regarding his involvement in what has occurred today.”

He said he has not spoken to Evans yet about his involvement.

The delegate from Wayne County said in a statement later on Facebook that he was heading back to West Virginia and “was simply there as an independent member of the media to film history.”

6:55 p.m.: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress will resume the Electoral College proceedings once the Capitol is cleared of pro-Donald Trump protesters and safe for use.

Pelosi said she made the decision Wednesday in consultation with the Pentagon, the Justice Department and the vice president, who will preside.

She noted the day would always be “part of history,” but now it would be “as such a shameful picture of our country was put out into the world.”

Trump had encouraged his supporters to come to Washington to fight Congress’ formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden’s win. He held a rally earlier Wednesday and urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to “get rid of the weak Congress people” and saying, “get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength.”

Trump supporters breached the Capitol building and clashed with law enforcement before disrupting Congress’ tallying of the Electoral College votes. Trump has repeatedly told his supporters that the November election was stolen from him, even though that is not true.

6:45 p.m.: Dozens of pro-Trump protesters remain on the streets of the nation’s capital in defiance of the curfew imposed after rioters stormed the Capitol.

The mostly maskless crowd was forcibly removed from the Capitol on Wednesday after breaking into the building and halting the constitutional process of voting to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s win. They were pushed out of the immediate area and moved down the hill, where they taunted law enforcement and moved barricades.

Police said anyone found on the streets after the 6 p.m. curfew would be arrested. Officers in full riot gear with shields lined the streets near the U.S. Capitol.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said their debate on affirming Biden’s victory would continue after the Capitol was secured.

6:40 p.m.: The head of the nation’s largest union of flight attendants says people who took part in the violent protest at the Capitol must be banned from flying.

Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, said in a statement Wednesday that “some of the people who traveled in our planes (Tuesday) participated in the insurrection at the Capitol today.”

She says, “Their violent and seditious actions at the Capitol today create further concern about their departure from the DC area. Acts against our democracy, our government and the freedom we claim as Americans must disqualify these individuals from the freedom of flight.”

Nelson and the union endorsed President-elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump before the November election.

Trump supporters on a Delta Air Lines flight from Salt Lake City to Washington heckled Utah Sen. Mitt Romney, the lone Republican senator to vote to oust Trump after he was impeached. On an American Airlines flight from Dallas, a large contingent of Trump supporters got in an angry yelling match with other passengers after one of the president’s supporters projected “Trump 2020” on the cabin ceiling and walls.

6:30 p.m.: Republican Sen. Mitt Romney is blaming President Donald Trump for inciting a violent “insurrection” at the Capitol.

Romney, the GOP’s 2012 presidential nominee and a frequent critic of Trump’s, said the violent breach of the Capitol on Wednesday was “due to a selfish man’s injured pride and the outrage of his supporters whom he has deliberately misinformed for the past two months.”

The Utah senator said those who continue to support Trump’s “dangerous gambit” by objecting to the results of a legitimate, democratic election “will forever be seen as complicit in an unprecedented attack against our democracy.”

Romney ridiculed Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and other Republicans who want an “audit” of the election results: “Please! No Congressional led audit will ever convince those voters, particularly when the president will continue to claim the election was stolen.”

The simple truth, Romney said, “is that President-elect (Joe) Biden won this election. President Trump lost.”

6:25 p.m.: President Donald Trump has appeared to justify the violent occupation of the U.S. Capitol by his supporters.

In a tweet Wednesday night, Trump said, “These are the things and events that happen when a sacred landslide election victory is so unceremoniously & viciously stripped away from great patriots who have been badly & unfairly treated for so long.”

He added, “Go home with love & in peace. Remember this day forever!”

Trump supporters breached the Capitol building and clashed with law enforcement before disrupting Congress’ tallying of the Electoral College votes. Trump has repeatedly told his supporters that the November election was stolen from him, even though that is not true.

Trump has faced mounting criticism from Republican lawmakers to do more to condemn the violence being perpetrated in his name.

6:20 p.m.: Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen says the violent pro-Trump protest at the U.S. Capitol was an “intolerable attack on a fundamental institution” of democracy.

Rosen said Wednesday that the Justice Department has been working with U.S. Capitol Police and other federal law enforcement agencies to secure the Capitol. He says hundreds of federal agents from Justice Department agencies were sent to assist.

He called it an “unacceptable situation” and said federal prosecutors “intend to enforce the laws of our land.”

Dozens of President Donald Trump’s supporters breached the security perimeter and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden’s presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.

Police declared the Capitol to be secure about four hours later.

6:10 p.m.: A woman who was shot inside the U.S. Capitol during the violent pro-Trump protest has died.

That’s according to two officials familiar with the matter who spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to speak publicly.

The Metropolitan Police Department said it was taking the lead on the shooting investigation. Police did not immediately provide details about the circumstances of the shooting.

Dozens of supporters of President Donald Trump breached the security perimeter and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden’s presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.

Hours later, police had declared the Capitol was secured.

5:50 p.m.: Officials have declared the U.S. Capitol complex “secure” after heavily armed police moved to end a nearly four-hour violent occupation by supporters of President Donald Trump.

An announcement saying “the Capitol is secure” rang out Wednesday evening inside a secure location for officials of the House. Lawmakers applauded.

The occupation interrupted Congress’ Electoral College count that will formalize President-elect Joe Biden’s upcoming inauguration on Jan. 20.

Lawmakers were evacuated to secure locations around the Capitol complex and Washington, D.C. after thousands of Trump supporters breached the building and skirmished with police officers.

Lawmakers have signaled that they would resume the constitutionally mandated count as soon as it was safe to do so.

5:45 p.m.: Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam have issued a curfew for two inner suburbs of northern Virginia as authorities sought to gain control after rioting at the U.S. Capitol.

The curfew applies from 6 p.m. Wednesday to 6 a.m. Thursday in Arlington County and the city of Alexandria, which are across the Potomac River from the nation’s capital. The curfew coincides with a similar order in the District of Columbia.

Northam said he issued the order at the request of local officials.

Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson confirmed that the city requested the curfew. He tweeted, “Let’s keep our community safe in the face of the terror we have seen across the River today.”

Virginia sent local and state police to the District to provide aid. Violating the curfew is a Class 1 misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail.

The curfew was imposed barely an hour before it was to take effect.

5:40 p.m.: Police are using tear gas and percussion grenades to begin clearing pro-Trump protesters from the grounds of the U.S. Capitol ahead of a curfew in Washington.

Police donned gas masks as they moved in Wednesday evening with force to clear protesters from the Capitol grounds shortly before a curfew took hold. In the moments before, there were violent clashes between the police and protesters, who tore railing for the inauguration scaffolding and threw it at the officers.

Police used tear gas and percussion grenades to break up the crowd, which began dispersing.

Dozens of supporters of President Donald Trump breached the security perimeter and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote to affirm Democrat Joe Biden’s presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.

Police said at least one person was shot inside the Capitol; their condition was not immediately known.

The district’s police chief said at least 13 people were arrested, and five firearms had been recovered during the pro-Trump protests on Wednesday.

5:30 p.m.: Republican Sen. Ben Sasse is directly blaming President Donald Trump for the storming of the Capitol by huge, angry crowds of pro-Trump protesters.

The Nebraska lawmaker and frequent critic of Trump said Wednesday evening that the Capitol “was ransacked while the leader of the free world cowered behind his keyboard — tweeting against his Vice President for fulfilling the duties of his oath to the Constitution.”

Sasse says in a written statement, “Lies have consequences. This violence was the inevitable and ugly outcome of the President’s addiction to constantly stoking division.”

The protesters broke into the building as Congress was beginning the formal process of certifying the electoral votes that gave Democratic President-elect Joe Biden a victory over Trump in November. Vice President Mike Pence has the ceremonial role of overseeing that certification and resisted Trump efforts to pressure him to overturn the election results.

Trump has continued to fallaciously claim that the voting was marred by fraud and that he actually won. Earlier Wednesday Trump addressed a huge crowd of protesters outside the White House and urged them to gather at the Capitol.

5:25 p.m.: The Washington, D.C., police chief says at least five weapons have been recovered and at least 13 people have been arrested so far in pro-Trump protests.

The mostly maskless crowd stormed the Capitol earlier Wednesday as lawmakers were meeting to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s win. One person was shot; their condition is unknown.

Police Chief Robert Contee called the attack a riot.

As darkness began to set in, law enforcement officials were working their way toward the protesters, using percussion grenades to try to clear the area around the Capitol. Big clouds of tear gas were visible.

Police were in full riot gear. They moved down the West steps, clashing with demonstrators.

Mayor Muriel Bowser earlier declared a 6 p.m. curfew.

5:05 p.m.: The police chief of Washington, D.C., says pro-Trump protesters deployed “chemical irritants” on police in order to break into the U.S. Capitol.

Police Chief Robert Contee says officials have declared the scene a riot. One civilian was shot inside the Capitol on Wednesday. Thirteen arrests were made of people from out of the area.

Mayor Muriel Bowser says the behavior of the Trump supporters was “shameful, unpatriotic and above all is unlawful.” She says, “There will be law and order and this behavior will not be tolerated.”

Metropolitan police have been sent to the Capitol, and authorities were coming in from Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey to help out. The National Guard was also deployed, as were Homeland Security investigators and Secret Service.

Trump had encouraged his supporters to come to Washington to fight Congress’ formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden’s win. He held a rally earlier Wednesday and urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to “get rid of the weak Congress people” and saying, “get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength.”

4:40 p.m.: President Donald Trump, in a video message, is urging supporters to “go home” but is also keeping up false attacks about the presidential election.

The video was issued more than two hours after protesters began storming the Capitol on Wednesday as lawmakers convened for an extraordinary joint session to confirm the Electoral College results and President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

Trump opened his video, saying, “I know your pain. I know your hurt. But you have to go home now.”

He also went on to call the supporters “very special.” He also said, “we can’t play into the hands of these people. We have to have peace. So go home. We love you. You’re very special.”

Republican lawmakers and previous administration officials had begged Trump to give a statement to his supporters to quell the violence. The statement came as authorities struggled to take control of a chaotic situation at the Capitol that led to the evacuation of lawmakers.

4:37 p.m.: Business Roundtable, an influential group representing U.S. companies, is calling on President Donald Trump and other officials to end the protests at the U.S. Capitol and begin a peaceful transition of power.

“The chaos unfolding in the nation’s capital is the result of unlawful efforts to overturn the legitimate results of a democratic election,” the Roundtable said in a statement Wednesday. “The country deserves better.”

The Roundtable represents some of the most powerful companies in America including Walmart, Apple, Starbucks and General Electric.

Trump had encouraged his supporters to come to Washington to fight Congress’ formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden’s win.

He held a rally earlier Wednesday in which he repeated his false claims that Biden had won the election through voter fraud.

He urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to “get rid of the weak Congress people” and saying, “get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength.” The Capitol went into lockdown after its security perimeters were breached and protesters entered the building.

4:35 p.m. At least one explosive device has been found near the U.S. Capitol amid a violent occupation of the building by supporters of President Donald Trump.

Law enforcement officials said the device was no longer a threat Wednesday afternoon.

Thousands of supporters of the president occupied the Capitol complex as lawmakers were beginning to tally the electoral votes that will formalize President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

Vice President Mike Pence has called on protesters to leave the Capitol immediately, going further than Trump, who merely called for his supporters to “remain peaceful.”

Angry supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in a chaotic protest aimed at thwarting a peaceful transfer of power, forcing lawmakers to be rushed from the building and interrupting challenges to Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory. Trump issued a restrained call for peace but did not call on his supporters to leave.

4:10 p.m.: President-elect Joe Biden has called the violent protests on the U.S. Capitol “an assault on the most sacred of American undertakings: the doing of the people’s business.”

Biden also demanded President Donald Trump to immediately make a televised address calling on his supporters to cease the violence that he described as an “unprecedented assault’ as pro-Trump protestors violently occupy U.S. Capitol.

Biden’s condemnation came after violent protesters breached the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday afternoon, forcing a delay in the constitutional process to affirm the president-elect’s victory in the November election.

Biden addressed the violent protests as authorities struggled to take control of a chaotic situation at the Capitol that led to the evacuation of lawmakers.

4:05 p.m.: Vice President Mike Pence is calling on protesters to leave the Capitol immediately, going further than President Donald Trump who merely called for his supporters to “remain peaceful.”

In a tweet Wednesday afternoon, Pence said, “This attack on our Capitol will not be tolerated and those involved will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”

Pence, long a loyal aide to the president, defied Trump earlier Wednesday, tell him he didn’t have the power to discard electoral votes that will make Democrat Joe Biden the next president on Jan. 20. Trump had publicly called on Pence to overturn the will of the voters, but Pence’s constitutional role in the process was only ceremonial.

Angry Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a chaotic protest aimed at thwarting the peaceful transfer of power. Trump later issued a restrained call for peace but did not ask his supporters to disperse.

4 p.m.: The Pentagon says about 1,100 D.C. National Guard members are being mobilized to help support law enforcement as violent supporters of President Donald Trump breached the U.S. Capitol.

Pentagon spokesperson Jonathan Hoffman said Wednesday afternoon that defense leaders have been in contact with the city and congressional leadership.

A defense official said all 1,100 of the D.C. Guard were being activated and sent to the city’s armory. The Guard forces will be used at checkpoints and for other similar duties and could also help in the enforcement of the 6 p.m. curfew being implemented tonight in the city.

The officials said the D.C. request for National Guard was not rejected earlier in the day. Instead, according to officials, the Guard members have a very specific mission that does not include putting military in a law enforcement role at the Capitol. As a result, the Guard must be used to backfill law enforcement outside the Capitol complex, freeing up more law enforcement to respond to the Capitol.

Hoffman said the law enforcement response to the violence will be led by the Justice Department.

3:55 p.m.: The top Democrats in Congress are demanding that President Donald Trump order his supporters to leave the Capitol following a chaotic protest aimed at blocking a peaceful transfer of power.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a joint statement on Wednesday after violent protesters stormed the Capitol. They said, “We are calling on President Trump to demand that all protestors leave the U.S. Capitol and Capitol Grounds immediately.”

Trump earlier encouraged his supporters occupying the U.S. Capitol to “remain peaceful,” but he did not call for them to disperse. He held a rally earlier Wednesday in which he repeated his false claims that President-elect Joe Biden had won the election through voter fraud.

He urged his supporters to march to the Capitol, telling them to “get rid of the weak Congress people” and saying, “get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength.”

3:50 p.m.: The White House says National Guard troops along with other federal protective services are en route to the Capitol to help end an violent occupation by President Donald Trump’s supporters who are seeking to prevent the certification of the 2020 presidential election.

Press secretary Kayleigh McEnany tweeted that “At President @realDonaldTrump’s direction, the National Guard is on the way along with other federal protective services.”

She added, “We reiterate President Trump’s call against violence and to remain peaceful.”

Republican lawmakers have publicly called for Trump to more vocally condemn the violence and to call to an end to the occupation, which halted a joint session of Congress where lawmakers were beginning to count electoral votes.

Trump lost the November election to Democrat Joe Biden. He has refused to concede and has worked over the last two months to convince his supporters that widespread voter fraud prevented his own victory.

3:40 p.m.: Republican lawmakers are increasingly calling on President Donald Trump to act to deescalate the violent protests at the U.S. Capitol by his supporters angry about his election loss.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said he spoke with the president earlier Wednesday and told him to make a statement to “make sure that we can calm individuals down.”

Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio tweeted that “it is crucial you help restore order by sending resources to assist the police and ask those doing this to stand down.”

Republican Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey told The Associated Press that while he sympathizes with the protesters’ position, they shouldn’t get violent, and it would be “nice” if Trump called on them to “protest in a peaceful way in an appropriate spot, where you belong, where you should be.”

Many Republicans had backed Trump’s false claims of widespread voter fraud to explain away his defeat to President-elect Joe Biden.

Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Gallagher, of Wisconsin, posted a video message urging Trump to “call it off.”

“This is Banana Republic crap that we’re watching right now,” said Gallagher, who had spoken out against objections from fellow Republicans to certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College vote.

3:37 p.m.: Supporters of President Donald Trump got into a angry shouting match with other passengers on a Washington-bound American Airlines plane after they projected a “Trump 2020” logo on the cabin ceiling and walls.

The Trump supporters said a passenger threatened to kill them, and there was yelling back and forth. A flight attendant intervened, telling one passenger in the aisle to sit down.

The incident occurred on Tuesday night after American’s flight 1291 from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport landed at Dulles International Airport outside Washington, D.C., and was taxiing to the gate.

The scene was posted on Twitter by Maranie Staab, a Portland, Oregon-based independent journalist who says on her website that she focuses on human rights and social-justice issues.

“Our team is reviewing this incident,” said American Airlines spokesman Curtis Blessing. “We applaud our outstanding crewmembers for their professionalism in de-escalating a tense onboard situation and getting our customers to their destination safely.”

American said law enforcement was not called, and that passengers deplaned and dispersed without further incident.

3:35 p.m.: The Department of Homeland Security is sending additional federal agents to the U.S. Capitol to help quell violence from supporters of President Donald Trump who are protesting Congress’ formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden’s win.

A spokesperson told The Associated Press on Wednesday that officers from the Federal Protective Service and U.S. Secret Service agents are being sent to the scene. He says they were requested to assist by U.S. Capitol Police.

Dozens of Trump supporters breached security perimeters and entered the Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden’s presidential win. They were seen fighting with officers both inside the building and outside.

Trump has riled up his supporters by falsely claiming widespread voter fraud to explain his loss.

— By AP writer Michael Balsamo

3:30 p.m.: One person has been shot at the U.S. Capitol as dozens of supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the building and violently clashed with police.

That’s according to a person familiar with the matter who spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday on condition of anonymity amid a chaotic situation.

The exact circumstances surrounding the shooting were unclear. The person said the victim had been taken to a hospital. Their condition was not known.

The shooting came as dozens of Trump supporters breached security perimeters and entered the U.S. Capitol as Congress was meeting, expected to vote and affirm Joe Biden’s presidential win. Trump has riled up his supporters by falsely claiming widespread voter fraud to explain his loss.

3:25 p.m.: President Donald Trump is encouraging supporters occupying the U.S. Capitol to “remain peaceful,” but he is not calling for them to disperse.

As he faced growing pressure from allies to condemn the violence Wednesday afternoon, Trump tweeted, “No violence!” adding: “Remember, WE are the Party of Law & Order – respect the Law and our great men and women in Blue.”

But Trump did not ask supporters to vacate the area as the unrest continued.

Trump had appeared earlier at a rally and had urged his supporters to march to the Capitol — at one point even suggesting he would join them. He is upset that he lost the presidential election to Democrat Joe Biden and has falsely claimed voter fraud to explain it away.

He also urged his supporters to “get rid of the weak Congress people” — presumably through primary challenges — saying, “get the weak ones get out; this is the time for strength.”

3:15 p.m.: A Defense Department official says Washington, D.C., has requested an additional 200 National Guard members as supporters of President Donald Trump violently clash with law enforcement at the Capitol.

That request is currently under review at the Pentagon to determine how the Guard can respond to support law enforcement.

According to officials, the Guard members have a very specific mission that does not include putting military at the Capitol. Instead, the Guard must be used to backfill law enforcement outside the Capitol complex, freeing up more law enforcement to respond to the Capitol.

Officials said the request for more National Guard has not been rejected.

Trump had urged his supporters to come to Washington to protest Congress’ formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden’s win. Several Republican lawmakers backed his calls, despite there being no evidence of fraud or wrongdoing in the election.

3:10 p.m.: Pressure is mounting on President Donald Trump to condemn supporters who are violently clashing with law enforcement on Capitol Hill.

Among those urging Trump to act: his former communications director, Alyssa Farah, who tweeted that Trump should “Condemn this now.”

She says, “you are the only one they will listen to. For our country!”

Dozens of people have breached security perimeters at the Capitol, forcing the lockdown of the building and halting the vote to certify Joe Biden’s presidential victory.

Trump has so far offered a single tweet asking his supporters to “Please support our Capitol Police and Law Enforcement. They are truly on the side of our Country. Stay peaceful!”

His former chief of staff Mick Mulvaney tweeted: “The President’s tweet is not enough. He can stop this now and needs to do exactly that. Tell these folks to go home.”

His lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, also addressed Trump supporters in a tweet, calling them the “patriots challenging the fraudulent election” and telling them that “POTUS wants you to EXPRESS YOUR OPINION PEACEFULLY.”

3 p.m.: Protesters backing President Donald Trump have breached the U.S. Capitol, forcing a delay in the constitutional process to affirm Joe Biden’s victory in the November election.

Trump urged his supporters to come to Washington to protest Congress’ formal approval of Biden’s win. Several Republican lawmakers have backed his calls, despite there being no evidence of fraud or wrongdoing in the election.

Protesters are now inside the Senate chamber. One got up on the dais and yelled “Trump won that election.”

Several dozen are roaming through the halls, yelling, “Where are they?”

Some were also in the visitors’ galleries.

2:50 p.m.: Members of Congress inside the House chamber were told by police to put on gas masks after tear gas was dispersed in the Capitol Rotunda amid skirmishes by supporters of President Donald Trump

Pro-Trump protestors breached the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday afternoon, violently clashing with law enforcement as lawmakers were gathered inside to formalize President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in November’s presidential election.

Law enforcement instructed lawmakers to retrieve masks from under their seats amid the clashes. The Capitol building was placed on lockdown, as Trump supporters marched through evacuated public spaces in the building.

After egging on protests, Trump tweeted to his supporters to “stay peaceful” as they violently clash with law enforcement and breached the Capitol building.

2:47 p.m.: After egging on protests, President Donald Trump tweeted to his supporters to “stay peaceful” as they violently clash with law enforcement and breached the Capitol building.

“Please support our Capitol Police and Law Enforcement,” Trump tweeted, as tear gas was deployed in the locked-down Capitol. “They are truly on the side of our Country. Stay peaceful!”

Trump at a rally earlier Wednesday encouraged his supporters to head to the Capitol.

“We’re going to cheer on our brave senators and congressmen and women, and we’re probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them,” Trump said.

2:45 p.m.: Lawmakers are being evacuated from the U.S. Capitol after protesters breached security and entered the building.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other senators were led out, escorted by staff and police on Wednesday afternoon. Members of the House were also being evacuated. Both chambers had been debating the certification of Joe Biden’s victory in the Electoral College.

The skirmishes came shortly after President Donald Trump addressed thousands of his supporters, riling up the crowd with his baseless claims of election fraud.

Protesters could be seen marching through the Capitol’s stately Statuary Hall shouting and waving Trump banners and American flags.

Some House lawmakers tweeted they were sheltering in place in their offices.

2:40 p.m.: The mayor of Washington, D.C., has ordered a curfew in the nation’s capital beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday after protestors seeking to overturn the election results stormed the U.S. Capitol building.

Mayor Muriel Bowser issued the order as protestors supporting President Donald Trump breached the Capitol, where lawmakers were meeting to formally count the electors that will make Joe Biden president on Jan. 20.

The order extends through 6 a.m. Thursday.

The skirmishes came shortly after Trump addressed thousands of his supporters, riling up the crowd with his baseless claims of election fraud.

2:30 p.m.: Protesting supporters of President Donald Trump have breached the U.S. Capitol.

There was confusion in the House chamber as the Capitol doors were locked and the debate over the electoral count was suspended.

A representative from the Capitol police spoke from a lectern on the dais and told lawmakers to remain calm, and that more information would be available soon.

House Rules Committee Chairman James McGovern of Massachusetts told the crowd that the House expected to go back into session soon. Meanwhile, members milled around the floor and looked at their phones.

Reporters and others outside the chamber were told to go their seats inside and not leave.

The skirmishes came just shortly after Trump addressed thousands of his supporters, riling up the crowd with his baseless claims of election fraud.

2:20 p.m.: The Senate has recessed its debate over an objection to the results of the Electoral College after protesters forced police to lock down the building.

Reporters were told to stay in the Senate’s press gallery as the doors were locked.

Protesters tore down metal barricades at the bottom of the Capitol’s steps and were met by officers in riot gear. Some tried to push past the officers who held shields and officers could be seen firing pepper spray into the crowd to keep them back.

The skirmishes came just shortly after President Donald Trump addressed thousands of his supporters, riling up the crowd with his baseless claims of election fraud.

2:20 p.m.: Texas Sen. Ted Cruz says American “democracy is in crisis” with polls showing that large numbers of voters “believe the election that just occurred was rigged.”

Cruz, a Republican, objected to the certification of election results in Arizona, saying the Senate has a responsibility to acknowledge the profound threat posed by widespread disbelief in the legitimacy of the election.

He called for the creation of a commission to conduct a 10-day “emergency audit” to investigate any irregularities, citing a similar commission created after the 1876 presidential election.

Cruz urged lawmakers not to “take the easy path, but instead act together” and create a “credible and fair tribunal. Consider the claims, consider the facts, consider the evidence and make a conclusive determination whether and to what extent this election complied with the Constitution.”