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Explore 10 Iconic High Country Courses with the Rocky Mountain Golf Card

Golfing allows you to enjoy the best of Colorado’s natural beauty, all while playing a challenging game with friends and family. 

The Rocky Mountain Golf Card helps you make the most of mountain summers. It gives you two-for-one access to the best mountain golf courses in Colorado.

The 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card returns this season with 10 iconic golf courses in the Colorado High Country. 

For just $79, you and your partner play for the price of one at all 10 golf courses. 

This Rocky Mountain golf card lets you experience the variety of challenges, scenery and restaurants that the best mountain golf courses in Colorado offer. 

With the Rocky Mountain golf card, golfing in the Colorado mountains has never been easier — or less expensive. Each card can save you up to $860. 

Simply reserve a tee time at any of the participating courses, pay one greens fee and bring a companion, who plays free. Each 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card entitles you to one BOGO-free round of golf at every one of the 10 participating Colorado mountain golf courses. If you plan on golfing a few resorts more than once, simply purchase a Rocky Mountain golf card for the best deal. 

“My husband and I purchased two cards from you. We used them all the time and want to thank you for offering this to us. It gave us the opportunity to try many different courses in our beautiful Colorado,” Kathy, a Denver resident, said.

Elevate your summer — and golf game — with free rounds at the following Colorado mountain golf courses:

Cedar Ridges Golf Course

Escape the hustle and bustle of it all at Cedar Ridges Golf Course. Located on the outskirts of Rangely, this course sits atop sweeping mesas. The 9-hole, par-36 course leads golfers through large rolling hills and greens, water and sand traps and evergreens. 

Frank Hummel, who has created over 200 courses throughout the United States, designed the course. It offers a minimum of three tee boxes on each hole, making the course challenging enough for any experienced golfer, yet thoroughly enjoyable for novices, as well. 

Don’t miss this hidden gem on the Western Slope. The course is always in immaculate condition and provides a nice pro shop and restaurant. 

“I was extremely impressed with this beautiful course in such a small, remote rural town,” Margaret, a golfer, said. “It’s worth the drive.”

(photo courtesy of Jeff Affleck)
(photo courtesy of Jeff Affleck)

Eagle Ranch Golf Club

Eagle Ranch Golf Club combines top-notch service, exquisite conditioning and an Arnold Palmer Signature Design within the spectacular setting of the Rocky Mountains. 

“What makes it unique to other mountain courses is that you’re still in the mountains with scenic views, but the course is on a flatter piece of land,” said general manager Jeff Boyer. “The most common compliments we get are about the design of the golf course. It plays more fair. It’s not an easy golf course by any means. It’s very challenging, but what you see is what you get. There are no funky bounces or hard to judge (holes).”

The club also welcomes families and kids; the fact that so many people ride their bikes to golf is a testament to its neighborhood warmth.

“It has the characteristics of a higher-end, private course, but it doesn’t have that pretentious atmosphere. It’s friendly, relaxed and welcoming to all,” Boyer said.

(photo courtesy of Glenwood Springs)
(photo courtesy of Glenwood Springs)

Glenwood Springs Golf Club

Voted best 9-hole public course in Colorado by the Denver Post, Glenwood Springs Golf Club is set against a breathtaking backdrop of surrounding mountains and valleys. 

The par-35 course features tree-lined fairways and meticulously manicured greens. Bends and turns on green #5 make it the most challenging to navigate, while #8 makes a hole-in-one the most exciting because you can see the ball soar the entire way.

“The other greens on our par threes are elevated and intriguing,” said general manager Jerry Butler. “Having won the award of Colorado’s number one 9-hole golf course (in 2018), you will be pleasantly surprised by its challenging greens. What you will like most about this club is the people. They are small-town friendly, and everyone will make you feel like you are at home.”

Rollingstone Ranch Golf Club

With a sporty Robert Trent Jones II layout, plenty of wildlife, gorgeous mountain scenery and superb greens, it’s no wonder Golf Digest named Rollingstone Ranch Golf Club at the Sheraton Steamboat Resort one of the best places in Colorado.  

“The course has a great mix of holes where precision is key, but at the same time you can pull driver and let it rip,” said Andrew Donner, director of golf. “Elevation changes are abundant but not extreme. The aspens frame up the golf course perfectly, and with Fish Creek meandering in and out, eye-popping golf shots are plenty.”

In addition, the sound of the roaring creek, the crackling of wood as a deer wanders by, the whistle of a marmot in the distance or a moose swimming across the pond are just standard “distractions” while golfing at the club, he said. “It doesn’t hurt that it is 80 degrees and sunny almost every day.”

Yampa Valley Golf Course

Lined by the lazy Yampa River, Yampa Valley Golf Course weaves through more than 240 acres of cottonwood trees, wetlands, native grasses and sages. 

Located in the heart of northwest Colorado, rolling hills create a gorgeous backdrop at this 18-hole course. 

As the oldest and most affordable facility in the Yampa Valley, the team’s mission is to provide a quality golfing experience wrapped in a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. The experienced, well-trained staff treats everyone like family and delivers outstanding service on its meticulously maintained course.

“(It has a) wonderful staff, beautiful course and some of the best views in the valley,” golfer Andrea Lyn Green posted on Facebook.

Golfer Tom Atkinson, who plays the course annually, aptly describes it as “a fun and unique golf experience.”

(photo courtesy of Haymaker Golf Course)
(photo courtesy of Haymaker Golf Course)

Haymaker Golf Course

What makes Haymaker Golf Course unique is the fact that it’s a traditional, links-style course, located in the middle of the Rocky Mountains. Mount Werner’s snow-capped peak frames many of the holes, while the picturesque Flat Top Mountain Range surrounds the course. Native grasses and wetlands enhance wide-open fairways, and the golf course has earned Audubon International’s Highest Distinction for maintaining the utmost environmental standards. This extraordinary preservation makes the area a great place to spot elk, eagles, blue herons and other wildlife.

Designed by Keith Foster, seven sets of tee boxes allow for play ranging from 7,300 yards to about 5,000.

“It’s a really great layout for every type of golfer,” said head golf professional Cody Hasten.

Meeker Golf Course

Tucked away in the quaint community of Meeker, the 9-hole Meeker Golf Course 

is a small and compact course full of character. Designed by Henry Hughes, it’s surrounded by mountains and livestock pastures. Wildlife is abundant, and it’s not uncommon to see a deer lying on a green.

“The atmosphere is just very casual,” said manager Becky Ridings. “It has the feel of a small-town course. It’s less uptight — no one is rushing you, so people just relax and feel more comfortable.”

“(It’s) a hidden gem, very picturesque,” wrote golfer Mark Tomlinson on Facebook. “The price is good, and (it has) very friendly staff and owners.”

Hole #5 can be the most challenging for golfers new to the course, since doglegs and trees obscure the hole from the men’s tee box. Ridings’ tip: As you go up over #3, look at #5 to get a sense of its layout.

(photo courtesy of Ranch at Roaring Forks)
(photo courtesy of Ranch at Roaring Forks)

Ranch at Roaring Fork Golf Course

Set against a picturesque scene of Roaring Fork Valley’s mountains, the Ranch at Roaring Fork Golf Course offers a well-kept 9-hole, par-3 course. Its authentic Colorado neighborhood vibe makes it perfect for all skill levels and ages, from beginners to scratch golfers.

As the first golf course in Carbondale, the Ranch at Roaring Fork prides itself on being family friendly and community oriented. Its challenging fairways, chipping and putting greens make it a great place to perfect your short game or just spend leisurely time with family and friends. 

Golfer Kevin Blanchard calls it a “fun quick nine before work, (with a) friendly accommodating staff.”

The course’s easy access from Highway 82 makes it simple to slide into almost any schedule. 

“This summer, escape the ordinary and breathe in the fresh mountain air as you golf in Colorado’s stunning Rocky Mountains.”

Raven Golf Club at Three Peaks

Considered one of the top courses in the nation by Golf Magazine, golfing at Raven Golf Club at Three Peaks is truly memorable. It features lush, rolling fairways and immaculate greens surrounded by pines, aspens and snow-capped, 13,000-foot mountain peaks. Crystal-clear creeks and lakes punctuate the award-winning course. 

“The Raven Golf Club sits at 9,000 feet in elevation and boasts a 225-foot drop from tee to green at the par 9th hole,” said general manager Ryan Parr. 

While the course is open to the public, it also has the fastest growing golf membership in Summit County, increasing by 115% in the last three years. 

With a full bunker renovation of all 88 bunkers, high-end, white sand in traps contrasts the blue sky and emerald greens.

Rifle Creek Golf Course

Nestled along the Grand Hogback Ridge, Rifle Creek Golf Course provides a unique golfing experience with two distinct 9-hole tracks. Its friendly and expert staff aim to make your golf day a memorable experience — and the views themselves are unforgettable!

This year, golfers voted Rifle Creek #8 in Golfers’ Choice courses in Colorado, as well as one of the top 25 courses in the nation.

“This is one of the best values in the area and the course and all the surrounding views are fantastic — especially the back nine,” commented Golfers’ Choice golfer Captainbadger. 

The open front nine holes weave across the sparkling Rifle Creek, offering a fairly easy walk. The back nine winds through rolling hills with elevated tee boxes. It’s challenging, and provides spectacular mountain views. In addition, its large pro shop has one of the largest selections of clubs, clothing and accessories on the Western Slope.

Rocky Mountain Golf Card

Buy one round and get your partner’s round free: At just $79, it’s your pass to play more — and to save up to $860 this summer.

Quantities are limited, so purchase your pass today at:

Vaildaily.com/golfcard

The 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card provides free access for golf partners at some of the best mountain golf courses in Colorado.  

This summer, escape the ordinary and breathe in the fresh mountain air as you golf in Colorado’s stunning Rocky Mountains. Every one of the 10 iconic courses on the 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card offers a different and invigorating experience to shake up your outdoor recreation routine and add more adventure to your season.

The Success of a Modern Mountain Club

With 361 current members, it’s obvious that Brue’s vision created a desirability for Frost Creek that has made it one of Colorado’s, if not the Country’s, biggest golf club community success stories of the past decade. (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)
With 361 current members, it’s obvious that Brue’s vision created a desirability for Frost Creek that has made it one of Colorado’s, if not the Country’s, biggest golf club community success stories of the past decade. (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)

Anyone who follows golf in the Western United States has no doubt heard of, tried to play, or has played a round of golf on Frost Creek’s renowned Tom Weiskopf designed mountain masterpiece. Since its inception in 2015, Frost Creek has caught the eye of golf and mountain lifestyle aficionados from all over the United States. With the steady leadership and vision of Owner Chad Brue and team, Frost Creek expanded its membership offerings, activities, on-site member cabins, and real estate sales program each year, including the addition of the residences at Hunter’s View in 2020 and a Forecaddie program last season.

With 361 current members, it’s obvious that Brue’s vision created a desirability for Frost Creek that has made it one of Colorado’s, if not the Country’s, biggest golf club community success stories of the past decade.

Custom homesites and the ability to build a luxury home have been an option at Frost Creek since the club opened and today 83 of the 93 custom homesites have been sold. In addition, there are 21 custom homes completed and occupied at Frost Creek with 13 currently under construction and at least four more breaking ground in Spring of 2022.

Custom homesites and the ability to build a luxury home have been an option at Frost Creek since the club opened and today 83 of the 93 custom homesites have been sold. (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)
Custom homesites and the ability to build a luxury home have been an option at Frost Creek since the club opened and today 83 of the 93 custom homesites have been sold. (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)

“In the first few years of the club’s existence we had memberships and homesites for sale. Membership sales took off quickly, but there weren’t many places for members to stay on-site. There was a big gap in what we offered at the time, though homesites were selling and custom homes were being built”, said sales director Kakie Holland. “One of the allures of homesite sales from the beginning has been that we don’t require a timeframe to break ground and the owner may choose their own builder and architect. It’s truly a custom experience.”

Brue began work to amend the club’s development agreement with Eagle County and from that success was able to expand their member cabin rental program the following summer. In 2020 the club was prepared to break ground on the first “for sale” homes at Frost Creek’s Hunter’s View neighborhood with development partner Paul Books, founder, and president of Palisade Partners.”

One question remained, “was it prudent to start building and taking presale reservations with the uncertainty of the start of the global pandemic?”.

Brue and Books determined that they would stay the course and build Hunter’s View starting that summer. It was a decision that proved fruitful. Hunter’s View was to include 44 total homes with the idea of releasing 15 homes that Summer. That release was expected to take a golf season or two to sell. Now, less than two years after the decision to break ground, only five pre-construction Hunter’s View homes remain available for sale. In early 2022, 14 Hunter’s View homes have been completed and are now occupied, an additional 11 homes will be finished by the end of the year and the remaining 18 will be completed by the end of 2023.

Frost Creek is a renowned Tom Weiskopf designed mountain masterpiece. (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)
Frost Creek is a renowned Tom Weiskopf designed mountain masterpiece. (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)

“We bought a homesite first and planned to build,” said Neill Roberts, member, and real estate owner at Frost Creek. “Then Hunter’s View became available, and we decided to buy a home there and move to Frost Creek full time, right away. My wife oversees the Southeastern United States region for her company and easily works from Hunter’s View and has exceptional flight access through Eagle County Regional Airport, less than 15 miles away. Our investment in the homesite has proven to be a good one and we haven’t decided what we’ll do with it yet. For now, Hunter’s View is perfect for us.”

Residents of Ft. Worth, TX, Jacob Ferguson, and his wife have two young children. They purchased their Hunter’s View home with a friend and stayed in it for the first time over the Holiday Season.

“We can’t wait to be here on and off throughout the year and for our children to grow up around Frost Creek. It’s great to get out of the heat and city and there is so much to do here.”

– Jacob Feruson, Ft. Worth, TX

“We can’t wait to be here on and off throughout the year and for our children to grow up around Frost Creek. It’s great to get out of the heat and city and there is so much to do here.”- Jacob Feruson, Ft. Worth, TX (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)
“We can’t wait to be here on and off throughout the year and for our children to grow up around Frost Creek. It’s great to get out of the heat and city and there is so much to do here.”- Jacob Feruson, Ft. Worth, TX (Photo courtesy of Frost Creek)
Information

For more information or to discover Frost Creek and Hunter’s View for yourself visit www.frostcreek.com or contact Sales Director, Kakie Holland kholland@frostcreek.com or 970-455-3072.

High-tech solutions and procedures elevate

Dr. Ernest Braxton, MD, MBA, continues to serve as the only board-certified neurosurgeon in the Vail Valley. “Working with the VSON surgery practices in Vail, Edwards, Frisco, Middle Park and Crested Butte, Dr. Braxton serves the surgical needs of countless patients from across the Colorado High Country.”

Part of his trusted expertise comes in his relentless pursuit of new equipment and innovative procedures, the main objective being a better surgical experience and a shorter, less painful recovery process – with some patients able to resume activities after just a day in the hospital.

“I try to find procedures that are the least invasive as possible,” Braxton said. To that end, he’s been a pioneer in using robotic and computer-assisted surgical techniques as well as regional anesthesia, with a high-tech approach that is centered on faster recovery, and durable relief.

Innovative, adaptive-geometry technology for spinal fusion

Most recently, that includes his use of new spinal fusion devices with “adaptive geometry” – a brand-new, expandable fusion tool that is designed to be more easily integrated to a recovering spinal injury.

VSON is using a brand-new spinal fusion device with “adaptive geometry” and expandable fusion allows patients a fast recovery from spinal injury.
VSON is using a brand-new spinal fusion device with “adaptive geometry” and expandable fusion allows patients a fast recovery from spinal injury.
Vail Mountain Rescue |

“The spine’s surface is not one size fits all.  This device conforms better to accept a patient’s anatomy, making it less likely to fail, and leads to less pain,” he said. 

The new adaptive geometry devices are also tiny – approximately 9 millimeters in size, expandable to 14 millimeters – meaning they can be surgically implanted and manipulated through very small incisions. 

Braxton said the new devices, which are made of a titanium-bonded shell integrated with carbon fiber-styled PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone), will be able to replace more traditional fusion devices which frequently cause metal-on-bone wear and fractures.

“They also allow a surgical technique that’s something like gardening through a picket fence or building a ship in a bottle,” he explained. “Rather than having extensive tissue disruption through an open surgery, which can be a painful process, we’re able to leave a lot of tissue in place, as the device is so small.”

Braxton employs a cannula, a tube just 18 millimeters wide, to insert the devices, and uses a high powered microscope to guide and place the adaptive geometry hardware.

Robotic and computer-assisted surgery to ensure perfect results

For these and other procedures, Braxton is now more frequently using robotic and computer-assisted surgical techniques to produce much more precise results – again, the end objective being faster healing and less postoperative pain.

“We use these systems to target and come up with the best solution to help stabilize the spine. The computer system also makes the results reproducible, every time, versus freehand surgery. The best surgeon is like a pro free-throw athlete, with 95% accuracy – this system can push that to 99%, which even the best surgeon can’t beat.”

Dr. Braxton works with VSON surgery practices in Vail, Edwards, Frisco, Middle Park and Crested Butte, Dr. Braxton serves the surgical needs of countless patients from across the Colorado High Country
Dr. Braxton works with VSON surgery practices in Vail, Edwards, Frisco, Middle Park and Crested Butte, Dr. Braxton serves the surgical needs of countless patients from across the Colorado High Country
Soccer wrap: Eagle Valley, Vail Mountain School boys pick up wins

During his 12 years of surgical practice, Braxton has spent much of his time continually working to explore new techniques and devices. 

“I constantly read about new ideas in medical trade journals, and I recently lectured at a surgical society meeting in Aspen. To learn about the adaptive geometry devices, I flew to the manufacturer in Florida and learned more about it, even practicing the procedures. I also spent time in Phoenix taking robotic training.”

Braxton said he anticipates even more high-tech solutions, all of which are geared at improving outcomes.

“We’re going to see a big wave of technology in the spine space over the next five years. The only real limit will be cost, and we are always aware of being fiscally responsible. For many patients, most procedures have been covered by insurance, as well.”  

In an effort to continually provide the very newest in cutting-edge surgical technology and procedures, all designed to shorten patients’ recovery time, Braxton is noted for being the first surgeon in the Vail Valley to offer the following services:

Awake laminectomy
Awake microdiscectomy
Awake transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion
Placement of intracranial ICP monitor
Craniotomy for subdural
Craniotomy for epidural hematoma
Thoracic laminectomy for spinal cord stimulator placement
Cervical anterior microforaminotomies
Resection of intradural spinal cord tumor
Single position computer-assisted oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion
Anterior lumbar interbody fusion
Lumbar artificial disc replacement
Outpatient cervical artificial disc
Outpatient spine fusion
First Chiari malformation decompression via suboccipital decompression
Pioneered robotic computer-assisted fusion surgery in Vail
First intercept procedure ablation of basivertebral nerve

‘No-Frills’ Tourism and the Arrival of a National Discount Airline

Photo courtesy of Getty Images.
Photo courtesy of Getty Images.

The shift from the pandemic to the endemic phase of COVID-19 seems certain — if not imminent. Omicron is on a downward trend. Medical opinion suggests we are now over the hump. Future virus waves, if any, are not presented as serious threats to our economic vitality nor to our daily routine. The end of mask mandates, a return of children to in-person school, the positive industry metrics being shared in news articles and Board reports are all signs that virus will play a less significant role in managing visitor activity moving forward.

As we are opening back up as an economy, the spotlight will return to long haul travel. Dominating that conversation currently is the Frontier-Spirit airline merger. If approved by the proper government agencies the merger will create the fifth largest airline in terms of seat capacity and the seventh largest in terms of revenue. In coming together, the two carriers will have created a ‘National Discount Airline,’ offering true competition to the Big Four: American, United, Delta, Southwest.

Historical research on airline mergers suggests forthcoming price increases ranging from 15% to over 50%. Because a merger removes competition, there is little incentive to keep fares low. Whilehaving fewer carriers would make the market less competitive, this is not the positioning Frontier-Spirit is likely to take.

The desire to compete against the Big Four is an important distinction. Frontier and Spirit are two like-minded carriers. The competition they create will be real — more real than had the merger been a larger legacy carrier scooping up one of the low-cost carriers and folding them into their full-service model.

The proper way to think of the merger is that it is one big expansion of a discount pricing model. When combined the new airline could service more than 1,000 daily flights to more than 145 destinations — around 7% of the nation’s total capacity, compared to the Big Four’s capacity of 20% each. Aiding that competition is an increase in planes. By the end of 2026, the new airline expects to fly 493 planes, a 75% increase from the 283 planes currently. Discount travel to more markets may entice those on the sidelines currently unable or unwilling to pay a premium.

The future of a national discount airline relies on an economic reality created by the Big Four: air travel is mostly unaffordable for many leisure travelers. While message boards and comment sections may poke fun at the service experience of a low-cost-carrier, they forget something important — for a growing segment of the population, low-cost-carriers are the only reasonable flight option.

Another development comes from the lodging sector where ‘limited-service’ is the popular term for ‘low-cost.’ Wyndham is developing an economy-tier extended-stay brand focused on blue-collar business travel segments, for example.

Combining the airline and lodging examples, we predict a future no-frills approach to tourism in a more defined way. Big time, first class, premium experiences will still exist, but the market is signaling room for another segment. If the travel industry was buoyed in the first stages of the pandemic by the high-end traveler, then the endemic stage of the pandemic is likely to see the importance of discount travel.

Frontier-Spirit observers seeking viability of the no-frills segment need only to look at the recent arrival of Avelo, Breeze and Aha — three new budget carriers serving overlooked or smaller destinations and using alternative airports. They offer a la carte pricing, so passengers only pay for what they need.

Aha, for example, flies 50-seat Embraer E145 planes three times weekly from Reno-Tahoe to secondary and tertiary West Coast destinations. These lower-capacity planes are easier to fill. These examples from different sectors of the travel industry confirm that a low-frills approach is practical in the marketplace  and that discount travelers are going to be an important segment as 2022 unfolds.

Heal at home

“As a board-certified athletic trainer, I have a skill set to allow you to be active for life,” Lexi Mossman said. “It’s all personalized for you and your sport.” Photo courtesy of MOUNTAINFIT.
“As a board-certified athletic trainer, I have a skill set to allow you to be active for life,” Lexi Mossman said. “It’s all personalized for you and your sport.” Photo courtesy of MOUNTAINFIT.
Ski injury prevention tips

MOUNTAINFIT customizes exercise programs to each client, but here are a few general exercises for injury prevention.

  • To improve balance: Try standing on a couch pillow on one leg for 30 second
  • Roll out your IT Bands and calves with a foam roller.
  • Use hot and cold therapy for pain relief, preparation and recovery.
  • Stick to riding your level or terrain; notice when you start to get tired — and stop.
  • Strengthen your hamstrings and glutes. Learn more about injury prevention with easy-to-follow exercises in MOUNTAINFIT’s free online Training Room at https://mountainfitco.com/pages/training-room-1.

When Lexi Mossman brought sports medicine injury prevention and treatment directly into Vail Valley homes in 2015, she was ahead of the curve. Little did she know that COVID concerns would make her services safe and even more comfortable for locals and visitors.

Mossman, a licensed and certified athletic trainer, has worked for University of Michigan’s football and hockey athletes, as well as XGames and Burton US Open competitors, keeping them safe and healthy. Mossman is a sports medicine specialist with a degree in kinesiology along with certifications in concussion management, myofascial cupping, performance breathing, kinesio taping and yoga.

When she moved to the Vail Valley, she recognized the need for home sports medicine, so she launched a mobile, on-demand service called MOUNTAINFIT. Since then, it has earned 2020 Vail Valley’s small business of the year.

Mossman travels to clients’ homes anytime, day or night, to evaluate and treat new or old, nagging injuries. She also provides people with an arsenal of exercises to prevent injuries.

“As a board-certified athletic trainer, I have a skill set to allow you to be active for life,” she said. “It’s all personalized for you and your sport.”

Lexi Mossman is a sports medicine specialist with a degree in kinesiology along with certifications in concussion management, myofascial cupping, performance breathing, kinesio taping and yoga. Photo courtesy of MOUNTAINFIT.
Lexi Mossman is a sports medicine specialist with a degree in kinesiology along with certifications in concussion management, myofascial cupping, performance breathing, kinesio taping and yoga. Photo courtesy of MOUNTAINFIT.

She believes an essential element of preventing injuries involves proper recovery from your active day as well as your old injuries. She employs the tools she has effectively used on elite, collegiate and professional athletes to your doorstep, with hands-on treatment, cupping, kinesio tape, Graston, prescriptive movements, exercise and sports rehabilitation techniques.

Mossman evaluates injuries so people don’t have to sit in an urgent care clinic when they feel most vulnerable and hurt. If x-rays or other images are necessary, she refers patients to the nearest physician.

Some of the most common injuries she evaluates and treats involve surgical and nonsurgical orthopedic issues like torn ACLs, MCLs, rotator cuffs and plantar fasciitis, as well as concussions. While specializing in injury prevention, her aim is to: help clients be athletes for life in the safety and comfort of their own homes by treating musculoskeletal aches or pains and improving joint health and mobility.

MOUNTAINFIT provides people with an arsenal of exercises to prevent injuries. Photo courtesy of MOUNTAINFIT.
MOUNTAINFIT provides people with an arsenal of exercises to prevent injuries. Photo courtesy of MOUNTAINFIT.

“I get you to feel mountain ready and confident on the hill — to be an athlete for life,” she said.

She fully understands that people live here for a reason: to be active. Her passion for helping everyone remain active and healthy radiates as she individualizes treatment for every client.

“I firmly believe that in order to stay active and continue to do what we love, it is vital to proactively safeguard against injuries and seek timely treatment when they do occur,” she said. “MOUNTAINFIT is here to effectively service your individual needs and keep you doing what you love in the mountains.”

So, whether you have a few aches and pains, a fresh injury or simply want to take proactive steps to ensure you remain healthy and active in the mountains, MOUNTAINFIT provides safe, effective and timely evaluations and treatments in the comfort of your own home.

To book a session, visit https://mountainfitco.com

Treating dizziness and balance

In addition to vestibular rehabilitation, Campbell works with orthopedic injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation and injury prevention. Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Othopaedics.
In addition to vestibular rehabilitation, Campbell works with orthopedic injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation and injury prevention. Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Othopaedics.
Sarah Campbell treats all kinds of dizziness stemming from a variety of factors, but the most common is vertigo, which is often caused by issues in the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Othopaedics.
Sarah Campbell treats all kinds of dizziness stemming from a variety of factors, but the most common is vertigo, which is often caused by issues in the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Othopaedics.

There is a treatment for dizziness: That’s the message Sarah Campbell, PT, DPT, OCS has been bringing to patients at Avalanche Physical Therapy in Silverthorne since 2017.

As a board certified orthopedic specialist in physical therapy, Campbell is also certified in vestibular rehabilitation through the American Institute of Balance. She’s one of the first to offer vestibular rehabilitation in Summit County.

She treats all kinds of dizziness stemming from a variety of factors, but the most common is vertigo, which is often caused by issues in the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Vertigo makes people feel as if their surroundings are moving (spinning, whirling or tipping), significantly impacting balance.

Age and gender both play a factor in dizziness; most vestibular issues occur after age 50, with women being more prone than men to. However, it’s quite common for younger people, from their 20s on, to suffer from vertigo as well.

A lot of people think they just have to live with dizziness: Their mother and grandmother suffered from it, so they have to, too. But Campbell says: “There’s definitely a lot we can do.”
She starts with an in-depth evaluation and then introduces therapeutic exercises, which may include simple positional drills to training visual reflexes, visual tracking and balance.

A non-surgical approach to treating musculoskeletal conditions is key to returning to an active, healthy lifestyle. Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Othopaedics.
A non-surgical approach to treating musculoskeletal conditions is key to returning to an active, healthy lifestyle. Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Othopaedics.

Vertigo often stems from how the vestibular system in the inner ear communicates with the brain. Length of treatment varies from patient to patient, but if it’s just a matter of crystals being out of place, it typically only takes two to three sessions. If it stems from improper signals between the brain and vestibular system, treatment may last six to eight weeks, in order to retrain the brain.

Properly treating dizziness prevents complications down the road. Dizziness can lead to falls, which can cause concussions or orthopedic injuries like broken bones or torn ligaments. But what a lot of people don’t realize is how they compensate for dizziness: Many lock their head down or don’t rotate their neck as much, which can cause stiffness and other orthopedic problems.

“Unfortunately, we usually see a person a couple weeks after the dizziness has started, the earlier they get treatment, the better,” Campbell said. “We don’t want people to be less functional.”

In addition to vestibular rehabilitation, Campbell works with orthopedic injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation and injury prevention. She has achieved a masters level in functional dry needling certifications to help patients recover efficiently. She particularly enjoys teaching people how to strengthen their bodies after injuries and other various conditions; she believes a non-surgical approach to treating musculoskeletal conditions is key to returning to an active, healthy lifestyle.

“I’ve always loved anatomy and the puzzle of the human body,” she said. “Physical therapy allows me to spend time with patients and piece things together. Our patients are so great. I just want to get them back to doing what they love.”

Vote Yes for 6A! All Access Rec

Photo taken by Nate Peterson for Vail Daily
Photo taken by Nate Peterson for Vail Daily

It’s crystal clear that our valley has become a world renowned destination; prized as a pinnacle of health and wellness. In this year’s local election, Yes for 6A gives voters the opportunity to double down and invest in the health, wellness, and happiness of locals. Yes for 6A means year-round access to new community spaces, behavioral health programs and social activities for everyone who calls the Eagle River Valley home. 

As one of the valley’s longest-standing providers of health and wellness activities, primarily for locals, Mountain Rec now looks to expand its facilities through a capital improvement project called All Access Rec. Currently over capacity everyday and with our community asking for more space and more activities – it’s time to invest now. 

What a Yes Vote Means in November 
If approved in November, the ballot measure will allow Mountain Recreation to turn its aging facilities into vibrant multi-generational community centers and allow the district to enhance programs for kids, families, adults, and seniors. Supporting this initiative will cost the average homeowner just $18 a month in increased taxes thanks to the diligent fundraising efforts of Mountain Rec staff who have already raised $6 million to date and counting. This is the first property-tax increase request from the District in 20 years. 

Photo taken by Nate Peterson for Vail Daily
Photo taken by Nate Peterson for Vail Daily

Local Leaders Voice their Support 
So far, the ballot initiative has garnered support across the valley, including from many organizations, businesses, and individuals. See what local leaders have said about the initiative on Yesfor6a.org including some below: 

– “A yes vote is an investment in the overall health of this valley, both physically and mentally, and that investment is one we’re inclined to say voters won’t regret.”- Vail Daily Editorial Board, October 7, 2021 

– “Vail Health and Eagle Valley Behavioral Health support Mountain Rec’s goal of expanding and improving community recreation center facilities and programs,” offers Chris Lindley of EVBH. “Mountain Rec’s facilities have the power to increase year-round opportunities for physical exercise and create a stronger, more resilient community by creating social hubs for residents of all ages along with increased access to behavioral health programs and social activities.” 

– “Our board believes that voting YES on 6A signifies support for investment in our community that reaches across age, cultural, and economic divides. It’s a vote to preserve and enhance quality of life for our year-round residents.” – Chris Romer, Vail Valley Partnership 

– “Mountain Recreation is proposing an upstream solution to the physical and mental health struggles our community members experience every day. Community members of all income levels and abilities will have the opportunity to improve their health before they find themselves in the doctor’s office.” – Faviola Alderete 

– “Providing mountain kids with the opportunity to be their best in athletic arenas is crucial to self-confidence, team awareness, and the joy of sport. This starts with access to the activities, and Mountain Recreation has been there for so many of us, providing local kids the opportunities they might not get from higher-priced sport clubs.” – Geoff Grimmer

Photo taken by Nate Peterson for Vail Daily
Photo taken by Nate Peterson for Vail Daily

To date, Mountain Rec’s staff, volunteers, and our community have maximized every square inch of its facilities. In the pursuit of healthy and active lives over the past 20 years and across hundreds of programs; our community has become stronger and more connected at Mountain Rec. With your support we can build strategic foundations, giving way to improve local health, boost our economy, and provide a place where we all belong. 

This ad paid for by yes for 6a 

Specific Additions to Facilities

Edwards Field House 
– Fitness center with strength training and cardio equipment
– Fitness studios
– Locker rooms
– Community rooms and open gathering spaces
– Double indoor gymnasium with hardwood floors for basketball, volleyball, and pickleball
– Demonstration Kitchen

Eagle Pool and Ice Rink 
– Larger outdoor pool and support building
– Trailhead improvements
– Fitness center with strength training and cardio equipment
– Fitness studios
– Locker rooms
– Community rooms and open gathering spaces
– Double hardwood gymnasium for basketball, volleyball and pickleball

Gypsum Rec Center 
– Bumped out two-story fitness center
– New gymnasium for basketball, volleyball and pickleball
– Outdoor splash pad
– Major mechanical upgrades

¡Vote Sí por el 6A! All Access Rec

Edwards Community Center (Autor de la foto Mountain Recreation)
Representación del Centro Comunitario de Edwards” (Cortesía de Mountain Recreation)

Está claro que nuestro valle se ha convertido en un destino de renombre mundial; considerado como el pináculo de la salud y el bienestar. En las elecciones locales de este año, votar Sí por el 6A ofrece a los votantes la oportunidad de apostar por invertir en la salud, el bienestar y la felicidad de los ciudadanos. Sí a al 6A significa acceso durante todo el año a nuevos espacios comunitarios, programas de salud conductual y actividades sociales para todos los que llaman hogar al valle de Eagle River.

Como uno de los proveedores de actividades de salud y bienestar más antiguos del valle, principalmente para los ciudadanos, Mountain Rec busca expandir sus instalaciones a través de un proyecto de mejora capital denominado All Access Rec. Actualmente su capacidad diaria se encuentra saturada y con nuestra comunidad pidiendo más espacio y más actividades, ya es hora de invertir.

LO QUE SIGNIFICA VOTAR POR EL SÍ EN NOVIEMBRE
Si se aprueba en noviembre, esta medida de votación permitirá aMountain Recreation convertir sus antiguas instalaciones en vibrantes centros comunitarios multigeneracionales y permitirá al distrito mejorar los programas para niños, familias, adultos y personas mayores. Apoyar esta iniciativa le costará al ciudadano promedio $18 al mes en el aumento de sus impuestos gracias a los diligentes esfuerzos de recaudación de fondos del personal de Mountain Rec, que hasta la fecha ya ha recaudado $6 millones. Esta es la primera solicitud por parte del Distrito de aumento del impuesto a la propiedad en 20 años.

Eagle Community Center (Autor de la foto Mountain Recreation)
Representación del Centro Comunitario de Eagle (Cortesía de Mountain Recreation)

Hasta ahora, la iniciativa electoral ha obtenido apoyo en todo el valle, entre ellos, el de muchas organizaciones, empresas y particulares. Vea lo que los líderes locales han dicho sobre la iniciativa en Yesfor6a. org, incluidos algunos de los que aparecen a continuación:

“Un voto a favor es una inversión en la salud general de este valle, tanto física como mental, y nos inclinamos a decir que los votantes no se arrepentirán”. – Junta Editorial de Vail Daily, 7 de octubre de 2021

“Vail Health y Eagle Valley Behavioral Health apoyan el objetivo deMountain Rec de expandir y mejorar las instalaciones y programas de los centros de recreación comunitarios”, dice Chris Lindley de EVBH.

“Las instalaciones deMountain Rec tienen el poder de incrementar las oportunidades de ejercicio físico durante todo el año y crear una comunidad más fuerte y resiliente al crear centros sociales para residentes de todas las edades junto con un mayor acceso a programas de salud conductual y actividades sociales”.

“Nuestra junta directiva cree que votar por el SÍ en el 6A significa apoyar a la inversión en nuestra comunidad sin distinciones por diferencias de edad, culturales o económicas. Es un voto para preservar y mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros residentes durante todo el año”. – Chris Romer, Vail Valley Partnership

GypsumRecreation Center (Autor de la foto Mountain Recreation)
Representación del Centro de Recreación de Gypsum” (Cortesía de Mountain Recreation)

“Mountain Recreation propone una solución preliminar a los problemas de salud física y mental que experimentan a diario los miembros de nuestra comunidad.Miembros de todos los niveles de ingresos y capacidades tendrán la oportunidad de mejorar su salud antes de encontrarse en el consultorio del médico”. – Faviola Alderete

“Ofrecer a los niños de la montaña la oportunidad de dar lo mejor de sí mismos en los escenarios deportivos es crucial para la confianza en sí mismos, la conciencia de equipo y la alegría del deporte. Esto comienza con el acceso a las actividades, y Mountain Recreation ha estado ahí para muchos de nosotros, proporcionando a los niños locales las oportunidades que tal vez no podrían obtener de los clubes deportivos más caros”. – Geoff Grimmer

Hasta la fecha, el personal deMountain Rec, los voluntarios y nuestra comunidad, han aprovechado al máximo cada centímetro cuadrado de sus instalaciones. En la búsqueda de vidas activas y saludables durante los últimos 20 años y a través de cientos de programas; nuestra comunidad se ha fortalecido y está más conectada en Mountain Rec. Con su apoyo podemos construir bases estratégicas, dando paso a la mejora de la salud local, impulsar nuestra economía y proporcionar un lugar donde todos pertenecemos.

Esto es pagado por la campaña Sí para el 6A

Specific Additions to Facilities

Edwards Field House 
– Fitness center with strength training and cardio equipment
– Fitness studios
– Locker rooms
– Community rooms and open gathering spaces
– Double indoor gymnasium with hardwood floors for basketball, volleyball, and pickleball
– Demonstration Kitchen

Eagle Pool and Ice Rink 
– Larger outdoor pool and support building
– Trailhead improvements
– Fitness center with strength training and cardio equipment
– Fitness studios
– Locker rooms
– Community rooms and open gathering spaces
– Double hardwood gymnasium for basketball, volleyball and pickleball

Gypsum Rec Center 
– Bumped out two-story fitness center
– New gymnasium for basketball, volleyball and pickleball
– Outdoor splash pad
– Major mechanical upgrades

Red, White and Brew: ‘Tis the season for pumpkin beer

Unlike many other breweries that use pumpkin puree, Dogfish uses pumpkin meat, making it fresh and vibrant.
Courtesy photo

Roses are red, violets are blue. But in the Vail Valley, leaves are yellow and starting to fall off. In just a few weeks, the ski hills will open. It’s exciting times for many people. Even the Broncos are doing well so far — granted, last week’s loss was not pretty. But colder weather will bring changes to our daily routine. And that is valid for our choices of adult beverages as well. Red wines will prevail over whites, and darker beers will finally come to the front of the list. Here are some interesting options for you to try.

Red wine: Founded in the 1960s, Mas Des Bressades is located in Costieres de Nimes, in the southern part of the Rhone Valley in France, just west of the river. Grape-growing is vastly influenced by warm but windy days, thanks to the mistral. Winemaker Cyril Mares practices organic farming and his wines are stunning. His 2018 Cuvee Tradition Rouge is an equal blend of Grenache and Syrah. This fruit-driven wine is medium-plus-bodied with smoky, dark cherry and meaty flavors, rounded by ripe tannins on the tail end. An outstanding quality for its modest price tag. It’s certainly one of the best values under $15 — on sale for only $13.99 per bottle.

White wine: When it comes to Sauvignon Blanc, you probably think of New Zealand, France and the USA. But have you tried one from Chile recently? Or ever? Leyda Valley in Chile is bordered by the Andes to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. This unique landscape helps regulate the high daily temperatures by drawing cool air from the coast. This helps winemakers produce vibrant and fresh wines. The 2019 Boya Sauvignon Blanc is packed with fresh tropical fruit aromas on the nose. The palate is well-balanced with acidity and the finish is refined and crisp. Rated 90 points as well. An intriguing wine if you are a fan of this style. An approachable price tag of $15.99 awaits you. Enjoy.

Beer: Dogfish Head is one of the iconic breweries in the nation. Even though it is known for its hoppy and strong beers, it brews a wide variety of styles. One of my personal favorites from them is the Punkin Ale. Yes, it’s a pumpkin beer — ‘tis the season. The base is a full-bodied brown ale with just enough pumpkin and brown sugar flavors. Unlike many other breweries that use pumpkin puree, Dogfish uses pumpkin meat, making it fresh and vibrant. Brewed every fall since 1994, this is a must-try beer even if pumpkin is not your thing. A six-pack of bottles is only $13.99 for the whole month of October, so the best time to try one is now.

 

The Vail Mind Center’s multidisciplinary approach provides localized care for kids

Early intervention can be a key success factor in treating childhood behavioral issues (Sensory Gym photo, courtesy of The Vail Mind Center)
Early intervention can be a key success factor in treating childhood behavioral issues (Sensory Gym photo, courtesy of The Vail Mind Center)
Art Therapy Room best

In addition to the challenges presented by the pandemic, parents and their families also dealt with limited access to daycare, preschools and even primary care. The result has been a lot more hands-on time with their kids and more opportunities to notice behaviors that might be the early signs of developmental issues. 

Paul Graf, Founder and CEO of the Vail Mind Center, a comprehensive therapy provider based in Edwards – offering Speech, Occupational, Behavior, Art Therapy, Diagnosing and Counseling – said that recognizing those issues and taking steps for early intervention can be critical in helping to prevent behavioral problems in the teen years and beyond.

“Parents often see lots of frustration and challenging behaviors in their young kids, which frequently indicates that the kids have needs which should be addressed,” he said. “And the sooner a child with a special need can be helped, the better the long-term outcomes.”

The collaborative care model means kids can receive more than just a single mode of therapy during their visits, either in the center, at home or via telehealth sessions (Art Therapy Room photo, courtesy of The Vail Mind Center)
The collaborative care model means kids can receive more than just a single mode of therapy during their visits, either in the center, at home or via telehealth sessions (Art Therapy Room photo, courtesy of The Vail Mind Center)

A personal mission
Graf launched the Vail Mind Center in 2019 after his own family found it impossible to get the care they needed here in Eagle County. Knowing his family was not alone in their needs for pediatric behavioral and mental health services, he decided to take on the mission of bringing them to the community.

“Getting a diagnosis was hard enough in itself. After being on a waitlist for many months, or even a year if you have Medicaid, most families have to drive down to the Front Range to get their children tested,” he said. “Once they receive a diagnosis, getting the services needed is still practically impossible.”

Now, with 17 therapists on staff including four Psychologists, wait times for a testing appointment at the Vail Mind Center are approximately six weeks.

“We have three kids, and the oldest suffered a range of issues, but after finally getting a diagnosis and seeking services, our eyes were opened to the state of pediatric services in Eagle County and beyond,” Graf said.

That led the Internet and technology startups entrepreneur to acquire a large space in Edwards and build a sensory gym with climbing wall, swings, individual treatment rooms, plus a large Art Therapy and social groups space. That created a fun environment for kids ages 0-21 to come to for therapy, all within a collaborative care model.

For other mountain town parents coping with limited access to care, Vail Mind Center has become an important resource, with over 70 children currently taking part in more than 100 sessions per week. Graf even has clients who come all the way from Fairplay to take part in local services.

The collaborative care model means kids can receive more than just a single mode of therapy during their visits, either in the center, at home or via telehealth sessions (Art Therapy Room photo, courtesy of The Vail Mind Center)
The collaborative care model means kids can receive more than just a single mode of therapy during their visits, either in the center, at home or via telehealth sessions (Art Therapy Room photo, courtesy of The Vail Mind Center)

Addressing needs early and collaborating
With teen depression and psychiatric issues an ever more pressing problem, especially with the disruption and social isolation of the pandemic, Graf said the Vail Mind Center can play an important role in spotting needs and offering early treatment to help kids have a more happy and healthy early childhood.

“When issues go untreated, they can have compounding effects. Too many of the teens and young adults currently struggling with anxiety, depression and substance abuse might have been able to avoid the extremes they are experiencing had their early childhood issues been appropriately addressed.”

The center often receives referrals from pediatricians, after wellness checks identify kids who are not reaching developmental milestones – the ability to talk, walk or other basic skills. Preschool screenings also can identify a child that may need services. Graf said many parents also contact the center directly and arrange an evaluation with staff, who are able to offer a diagnosis and start on therapeutic work.

The Vail Mind Center’s collaborative care model means kids can receive more than just a single mode of therapy during their visits, either in the center, at home or via telehealth sessions.

“We do a lot of in-home sessions, where we do applied behavioral analysis – a lot of behavior happens at home, and we can help mitigate that with a therapist there in person. Kids are able to have multiple services during the same visit, allowing therapists to co-treat or share the best evidence-based treatments from their respective disciplines.” 

Adaptable service model
As COVID led to restrictions on in-person services for all but the most severe cases, Graf said the Vail Mind Center discovered that telehealth sessions can often be just as effective for most kids.

“We came out of the whole experience last spring recognizing the powers of telehealth, which sort of went against conventional wisdom,” he said. “But we found we were able to work as or more effectively with many kids via telehealth sessions – most kids flourished. We also got more parental engagement, as parents actively participated and learned techniques they could deliver at home. Parental training is still key, either in the clinic or on Zoom.” Those telehealth sessions have been so successful that Graf has just launched Healthy Young Minds, an entirely online therapeutic service which provides similar therapy to kids across the country, using a mixture of local and national therapists.