Karats to display timeless jewelry | VailDaily.com

Karats to display timeless jewelry

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Carolyn Tyler will return to Karats this year to display her work.
Special to the Daily

Once again, renowned jewelry artist Carolyn Tyler brings a veritable cornucopia of designs to her Karats trunk show beginning today and running through Tuesday. All of her unique pieces are handmade in matte-finish, high-karat gold set with beautiful gemstones, coins and pearls. Tyler’s theme this time is: “wearable happiness.”

The designer believes that we all could use a little adornment-based color therapy these days.

“I can actually see it in action when people come into my shows,” Tyler says. “They start absent-mindedly perusing, then their eyes light on some piece … and their faces soften and a little smile creeps in, their eyes get big and in some cases, they become giddy and start salivating. That’s when I jokingly offer them a bib … a bib necklace, that is.”

Tyler believes that beauty, in all its forms, is healing and she explains there is solid science behind this.

Beholding something we consider lovely causes pleasurable sensations as we are flooded with endorphins. These “feel good” neurotransmitters reduce stress, which boosts our immune system and creates a sense of well-being. So the next time your partner says they don’t understand your fascination with all that glitter, explain the “jewelry joy” effect. You might add that although it can be habit-forming, it is non-fattening, has lasting value and the happiness factor is multiplied by the amount of people who compliment you while wearing it.

“Jewelry is truly the gift that keeps on giving,” Tyler said.

Tyler calls herself “a contrarian and iconoclast by nature,” and is not influenced by fashion’s whims.

“Truthfully, I have no idea what’s popular or trendy right now — in fact, if I knew, I would consciously avoid it,” Tyler said. “I prefer to play and create in the realm of timeless beauty and platonic ideal forms, like the golden mean and sacred geometry.”

The other-worldliness of glittering, glowing, gems, fascinating textures, inspired craftsmanship and eternally satisfying proportions is what stimulates Tyler’s imagination. “I hope it doesn’t sound grandiose, but the level of design and craftsmanship I strive for is reminiscent of Buccelatti, Lalique and Faberge, the master jewelers of the Golden Age,” Tyler said.

Tyler’s work will be on display to prove that, as Coco Chanel said, “Fashions come and go, but good taste is eternal.”