Walking Mountains presents the Science Behind Stem Cell Therapy with Dr. Scott Brandt, Aug. 17 | VailDaily.com

Walking Mountains presents the Science Behind Stem Cell Therapy with Dr. Scott Brandt, Aug. 17

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Harvesting stem cells for regenerative therapies. Walking Mountains Science Center will host special guest Dr. Scott Brandt, medical director at ThriveMD, for a discussion on the Science Behind Stem Cell Therapy on Wednesday, Aug. 17, at 6:30 p.m.
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If you go …

What: Science Behind Stem Cell Therapy.

When: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 17.

Where: Walking Mountains Science Center, 318 Walking Mountains Lane, Avon.

Cost: Free, $5 donation suggested.

More information: Space is limited; visit www.walkingmountains.org/sb to register.

AVON — Stem-cell therapy, also known as regenerative medicine, promotes the reparative response of diseased, dysfunctional or injured tissue using stem cells. These stem cells are manipulated to specialize into specific types of cells, such as heart muscle cells, blood cells or nerve cells. The specialized cells can then be implanted into a person.

For example, if the person has heart disease, the cells could be injected into the heart muscle. The healthy, transplanted heart cells could then contribute to repairing defective heart muscle. Self-derived (autologous) adult stem cell therapy is one of the newest and most innovative avenues in regenerative medicine. Only a few physicians in Colorado practice this minimally invasive procedure, which gives the body the potential to heal itself naturally.

Walking Mountains Science Center will host special guest Dr. Scott Brandt, medical director at ThriveMD, for a discussion on the Science Behind Stem Cell Therapy on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. While exploring the stem cell itself, Brandt will explain how your own stem cells carry huge potential to restore an active, pain-free life.

Brandt will walk attendees through the minimally invasive procedure that works to relieve the pain and limitations of damaged joint cartilage — without resorting to an invasive joint-replacement surgery. The procedure involves harvesting a patient’s own stem cells found in fat tissue, most often from the abdominal region, to stimulate the body to repair and replace damaged tissue in any joint or soft-tissue structures.

What Stem Cells Do

The tissue is prepared in a cell-processing laboratory and injected into the ailing joint utilizing fluoroscopic guidance. Once injected, the cells can sense proteins that have been generated from cartilage damage. In response, these cells have the ability to make chondrocytes, which are the type of cells found in healthy cartilage. Then through chondrogenesis (cartilage cell division), the damaged cartilage can be replaced with healthy cartilage tissue.

Brandt will also discuss the results he is seeing with autologous stem cell therapy and why he prefers using adipose (fat) derived stem cells. Brandt has trained extensively across the country and continues to incorporate advancements in the field as rapidly as scientific evidence supports their addition. He is actively involved in research and publication, giving instructional workshops and presenting on a variety of subjects in regenerative medicine and advanced interventional pain management.

Clinical research during Brandt’s career has focused on the safety and efficacy of novel devices. These efforts have resulted in the development and patenting of innovative medical technology. Brandt is licensed in the state of Colorado, board certified by the American Board of Anesthesiology and has been an International Spinal Injection Society instructor. He has been a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists, International Spinal Injection Society and the American Board of Pain Medicine.

Learn more about ThriveMD at thrivemdvail.com or call 970-766-8245.