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Earth Day every day: How you can do your part to help work toward a cleaner future

Small actions in our daily lives can have a sizable impact on the planet’s health

Emily Kent
Special to the Daily

Walking Mountains Science Center makes it easy to locate resources that can enable us to take small actions in our own daily routines, and every little bit makes a difference.
Emily Kent/Special to the Daily

Since its inception in 1970, Earth Day is observed every year on April 22 to continue to foster global consciousness around the state of our planet and our natural resources that keep all living things growing and flourishing.

Today we find ourselves amid a very real urgency to not only talk about things like climate change, clean energy, ecosystem changes and extinction of species, but we find ourselves living in a now that needs each one of us to care about the ways in which we live out our daily lives, and to take what steps we can to work toward a healthier climate for our future generations.

Global climate change is the biggest challenge of our time. You can do your part to work toward a healthier climate for our future generations.
Emily Kent/Special to the Daily

Without a doubt, the past year has brought extraordinary challenges. Adding on individual responsibility to help save the planet may sound a bit daunting at the present time, but Walking Mountains makes it easy to locate resources that can enable us to take small actions in our own daily routines, and every little bit makes a difference.



Walking Mountains first developed a sustainability initiative called the Climate Action Collaborative for the Eagle County community in 2018. The central aim of the Collaborative is to empower the community to reduce local carbon emissions by 50% as we reach the year 2030, and to see an 80% reduction by 2050.

With community partners in local governments, businesses, utilities, schools and community organizations, the Collaborative meets regularly to implement recommended action points through the Climate Action Plan. This plan serves as a detailed guide for each one of us to utilize in determining what we can do to help our community preserve a healthy climate and keep our natural environments thriving.



Earth Day is observed every year on April 22 to continue to foster global consciousness around the state of our planet and our natural resources that keep all living things growing and flourishing.
Emily Kent/Special to the Daily

Here are a few things we can do to help:

Waste diversion

Transportation

  • Leave the car behind once or twice each week and instead walk, bike or take the bus if we’re able. TrendswithBenefits.org is available as an online tool to aid organizations in establishing a remote work policy.
  • Consider Colorado’s electric vehicle Incentives.
  • Take advantage of local rebates for e-bikes for Edwards residents and Holy Cross Energy customers.

Homes and buildings

  • Obtain a home energy assessment to learn about your home’s energy use and how we can start to move away from fossil fuels.
  • Change our light bulbs to LEDs and get a programmable thermostat.
  • Consider all-electric equipment when the old furnace/boiler breaks.
The central aim of the Climate Action Collaborative is to empower the Eagle County community to reduce local carbon emissions by 50% as we reach the year 2030, and to see an 80% reduction by 2050.
Emily Kent/Special to the Daily

Renewable energy

Water

  • Reduce outdoor water use as much as possible this summer. Read up on irrigation efficiency to understand our water use and how to optimize it.
  • Fix or replace leaky water fixtures.
  • Add compost to our gardens to improve soil health and water retention for plants.

Even just one or two tweaks made by an individual can go a long way toward helping the community see an environmentally healthy future. For further information about the Climate Action Collaborative, visit WalkingMountains.org/climate-action-collaborative.

Emily Kent is a photographer based in Eagle County whose work focuses primarily on our natural surroundings. She is passionate about the care and preservation of our outdoor spaces and wild places and is a member of Nature First, a global Alliance for Responsible Nature Photography. She works with nature networks and organizations like Walking Mountains Science Center in Eagle County that are doing good things for the community and for the environment. Find more of her work at EmilyKentPhotography.com.


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