Letter: A better idea than renaming Gore Range | VailDaily.com
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Letter: A better idea than renaming Gore Range

George Gore was a bloodthirsty 19th-century aristocrat and slaughterer of thousands of wildlife for the sole reason of killing, and then telling his tales of his adventures to those who would listen.

The Summit County Commissioners are aghast by such as are the Wilderness Society and the Southern Ute Indians. The current name, Gore Range, must change. Now the Vail Town Council is trying to decide what to do. The current name does not fit the narrative of today’s 21st century aristocrats, therefore it must be changed.

Given the fact that the range has been given the name Gore and is known by thousands, if not millions by that name, might I suggest another option. Follow what the great leaders of King County Washington did in 1986.



King County was named after William King, vice president under Franklin Pierce. King was from Alabama and was an owner of slaves. Understandably, the commissioners of King County Washington (named after George Washington, also an owner of slaves) were aghast by the fact that their county was named after William King. It was at that time that they passed a resolution to rename the county after Martin Luther King Jr., thereby relieving themselves of living in a county of a slave owner from the 18th century, but keeping the name of the county the same, relieving themselves of having to deal with the “costs” that would be incurred and other related “issues” from a county name change in the late 20th century. No cost, no hassle.

Might I suggest that those who are so enraptured with the woke world that they do as those in King County, Washington, did so many years ago. Keep the name the same, change who it is named after How about Al Gore, former vice president and current climate change activist? He can fly over and leave a heart in the vapor trails of his private jet to thank us all for the honor.

Participate in The Longevity Project

The Longevity Project is an annual campaign to help educate readers about what it takes to live a long, fulfilling life in our valley. This year Kevin shares his story of hope and celebration of life with his presentation Cracked, Not Broken as we explore the critical and relevant topic of mental health.



Chris Markus

Edwards


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